This Day in History: 10/13/1792 - White House Cornerstone Laid

This Day in History: 10/13/1792 - White House Cornerstone Laid


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The cornerstone is laid for a presidential residence in the newly designated capital city of Washington. In 1800, President John Adams became the first president to reside in the executive mansion, which soon became known as the "White House" because its white-gray Virginia freestone contrasted strikingly with the red brick of nearby buildings. The city of Washington was created to replace Philadelphia as the nation's capital because of its geographical position in the center of the existing new republic. The states of Maryland and Virginia ceded land around the Potomac River to form the District of Columbia, and work began on Washington in 1791. French architect Charles L'Enfant designed the area's radical layout, full of dozens of circles, crisscross avenues, and plentiful parks. In 1792, work began on the neoclassical White House building at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue under the guidance of Irish American architect James Hoban, whose design was influenced by Leinster House in Dublin and by a building sketch in James Gibbs' Book of Architecture. President George Washington chose the site.


Today in History

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 13, the 287th day of 2020. There are 79 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight

On Oct. 13, 1775, the United States Navy had its origins as the Continental Congress ordered the construction of a naval fleet.

On this date

In A.D. 54, Roman Emperor Claudius I died, poisoned apparently at the behest of his wife, Agrippina.

In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid by President George Washington during a ceremony in the District of Columbia.

In 1932, President Herbert Hoover and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes laid the cornerstone for the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.

In 1943, Italy declared war on Germany, its one-time Axis partner.

In 1944, during World War II, American troops entered Aachen, Germany.

In 1960, John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon held the third televised debate of their presidential campaign (Nixon was in Los Angeles, Kennedy in New York).

In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered flight carrying 45 people crashed in the Andes survivors resorted to feeding off the remains of some of the dead in order to stay alive until they were rescued more than two months later.

In 1974, longtime television host Ed Sullivan died in New York City at age 73.

In 1999, the Senate rejected the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, with 48 senators voting in favor and 51 against, far short of the 67 needed for ratification.

In 2000, South Korean President Kim Dae-jung was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Longtime American communist Gus Hall died in New York at age 90.

In 2003, the U.N. Security Council approved a resolution expanding the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Afghanistan.

In 2016, Donald Trump heatedly rejected the growing list of sexual assault allegations against him as "pure fiction," hammering his female accusers as "horrible, horrible liars." Bob Dylan was named winner of the Nobel prize in literature.


Missing Capitol Building Cornerstone

View all photos

Few structures in U.S. history can match the level of architectural analysis directed at the Capitol Building, which has attracted national interest ever since George Washington laid the cornerstone on September 18, 1793. However, over the intervening years the location of that piece of memorial rock has become something of a mystery, and the Architect of the Capitol’s office has been looking for it ever since.

Locating a cornerstone may seem like a straightforward affair. Experience says that they can reliably be found where the walls of a building come together at right angles, usually with an inscription a few feet off the ground marking the date. However, what do you do when the bicameral structure in question was built, expanded and continually modified over the course of two centuries, with dozens of layered advancing and receding facades?

Add into the riddle the fact that we know that George Washington set the cornerstone below ground level on the basement level. A silver plaque under that is the only marker, and it’s proven an elusive geocache. It’s unclear which of the many corners is the corner, and you’d have to tear down the Capitol in order to check them all!

The Architect of the Capitol began its hunt for the cornerstone as the Capitol neared its centennial birthday in 1893. The public pressure was on and you can almost imagine lawmakers reminding the architect you had one job. Nothing conclusive was found. In the 1950s they reopened the cold case, this time with metal detectors and experts from the U.S. Geological Survey. Still nothing.

Finally, in 1991 Architect George White was going through primary source materials when he realized that all previous searches under the Senate side of the Capitol were based on a faulty assumption, the rock was more plausibly located under the southern House of Representatives. White thought that he hit pay dirt when excavations beneath the House’s basement coffee shop revealed something that had the smell of cornerstone.

“It looks like it was prepared for a ceremony,” Architect of the Capitol George White said optimistically . “It’s a big flat chunk of stone that weighs several tons by our estimates, from its size and composition, and it’s not something you’d be casual about.” While the rest of the foundation was composed of rubble and mortar, this find was five feet long and flat on the top and bottom.

However, as they dug deeper one irksome reality dogged the discovery: There was no memorial plaque to be found. “Without that silver plate, who’s to say?” Allen couched the find. “In terms of location, it’s right. In terms of size, it’s right. Every criteria are there, except for the silver plate, which unfortunately is the most important criterion.” Today the site of the 1991 White excavation has been covered over by a fresh piece of concrete, and the hunt continues.

Know Before You Go

The 1991 excavation was under the southeastern corner of the original House of Representatives wing, which is today known as Statuary Hall. Free tours of the building are offered through congressional offices. Savvy interns should be able to show you the way.


In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid by President George Washington during a ceremony in the District of Columbia.

In 1843, the Jewish organization B’nai B’rith was founded in New York City.

In 1932, President Herbert Hoover and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes laid the cornerstone for the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.

In 1957, CBS-TV broadcast “The Edsel Show,” a one-hour live special starring Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra designed to promote the new, ill-fated Ford automobile. (It was the first special to use new videotape technology to delay the broadcast to the West Coast.)

In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered flight carrying 45 people crashed in the Andes survivors resorted to feeding off the remains of some of the dead in order to stay alive until they were rescued more than two months later.

In 1999, the Senate rejected the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, with 48 senators voting in favor and 51 against, far short of the 67 needed for ratification.

In this photo released by the Chilean government, the last miner to be rescued, Luis Urzua (left), shakes hands with Chile's President Sebastian Pinera after being freed from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he had been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, on Oct. 13, 2010. (Photo: Associated Press)

In 2010, rescuers in Chile using a missile-like escape capsule pulled 33 men one by one to fresh air and freedom 69 days after they were trapped in a collapsed mine a half-mile underground.

Ten years ago: Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, after meeting with human-rights activists in Moscow, told reporters the Russian government under Vladimir Putin had amassed so much central authority that the power grab could undermine its commitment to democracy.

Five years ago: Republicans Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan rallied college students in all corners of Ohio President Barack Obama took time off the campaign trail to practice for the next debate against his GOP rival.

One year ago: Bob Dylan was named winner of the Nobel prize in literature.

Paul Simon performs at Summerfest's American Family Insurance Amphitheater June 30. (Photo: Rick Wood/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)


White House cornerstone is laid

On this day in 1792, the cornerstone of the White House is laid in the nation’s new capital, Washington, D.C.

George Washington, who had been in office just over a year when the site for the capital was determined, asked a French architect and city planner named Pierre L’Enfant to design the new city. The mansion itself was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban and eventually became known as the “White House.” George Washington, however, never lived in the mansion. It was not completed until 1800. President John Adams and his wife Abigail were its first residents, but they lived there less than a year. Thomas Jefferson, the nation’s third president, moved in in 1801.

The White House has undergone several renovations since its completion. In August 1814, during the War of 1812, British troops invaded Washington, D.C. and set fire to the White House, almost burning it to the ground. Though then-President James Madison and his wife Dolley were never able to move back into the mansion, the building had been substantially reconstructed by 1817, when James Monroe took over the presidency. During the Eisenhower (1950 – 1961) and Kennedy (1961- 1963) administrations, the White House again underwent refurbishing and redecorating.

At one time or another, the mansion has sported a variety of amenities, including horse stables and carriage houses, a bowling alley, a jogging track, a movie theater and solar panels. In addition to the presidents and their families, the executive home has also been home to an impressive assortment of animals: dogs, cats, goats, pigs, tiger cubs, an elephant, a zebra, snakes and an alligator.


Historical Events in 1792

Event of Interest

Mar 29 King Gustav III of Sweden dies after being shot in the back at a midnight masquerade ball at Stockholm's Royal Opera just 13 days earlier. He is succeeded by Gustav IV Adolf.

    Gronings feminist Etta Palm demands women's right to divorce The Coinage Act is passed establishing the United States Mint and authorizing the $10 Eagle, $5 half-Eagle & 2.50 quarter-Eagle gold coins & silver dollar, ½ dollar, quarter, dime & half-dime

Event of Interest

Apr 5 George Washington casts 1st presidential veto

Declaration of War

Apr 14 France declares war on Austria, starting French Revolutionary Wars

Execution

Apr 21 Brazilian revolutionary Tiradentes, is hanged, drawn and quartered in Rio de Janeiro

    Guillotine first used in France, executes highwayman Nicolas Pelletier "La Marseillaise", later the national anthem of France, is composed by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle in Strasbourg

Event of Interest

May 5 Jean Baptiste Joseph Delambre commissioned to measure the meridian between Dunkerque to Rodez to calculate accurate length of the metre

    Captain Robert Gray discovers Grays Harbor (Washington) British Captain George Vancouver sights and names Mt Rainier, Washington US establishes the military draft Columbia River discovered & named by US Captain Robert Gray Denmark abolishes slave trade 24 merchants form New York Stock Exchange at 70 Wall Street Russian army enters Poland Mount Unzen on Japan's Shimabara Peninsula, erupts creating a tsunami, killing about 15,000 Japan's deadliest volcanic eruption Kentucky admitted as 15th US state Captain George Vancouver claims Puget Sound for Britain Captain George Vancouver discovers site of Vancouver, British Columbia

Event of Interest

Jun 13 King Louis XVI dismisses French government

    Vancouver meets Spanish ships Sutil & Mexicana off Vancouver, British Columbia France declares war on Prussia

Event of Interest

Aug 10 Papers from the Tuileries Palace, proving the Comte de Mirabeau had secret dealings with the court are revealed

Event of Interest

Aug 13 Revolutionaries imprison French royals, including Marie Antoinette

    British man o'war HMS Royal George capsizes at Spithead more than 800 killed September Massacres of the French Revolution: In Paris rampaging mobs slaughter 3 Roman Catholic bishops, more than two hundred priests, and prisoners believed to be royalist sympathizers. The French Blue gem (later the Hope Diamond) is stolen with other French crown jewels from Royal storehouse in Paris during Reign of Terror

Mutiny On The Bounty

Sep 12 Court martial begins for instigators of the mutiny on the Bounty on board HMS Duke in Portsmouth harbour, presided over by Vice-Admiral Samuel Hood

Captain Bligh (Trevor Howard) faces mutineer Fletcher Christian (Marlon Brando) in the 1962 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film Mutiny On The Bounty

Event of Interest

Sep 21 French Revolution: The National Convention passes a proclamation announcing the formal abolition of the French monarchy

Event of Interest

Sep 26 Marc-David Lasource begins accusing Maximilien Robespierre of wanting a dictatorship for France

Event of Interest

Oct 12 First celebration of Columbus Day in the USA held in New York

    "Old Farmer's Almanac" is 1st published and edited by Robert Thomas Cornerstone laid for the Executive Mansion (White House) in Washington Mount Hood (Oregon) is named after the British naval officer Alexander Arthur Hood by Lt. William E. Broughton who spotted the mountain near the mouth of the Willamette River. Battle of Jemappes: French army beats Holy Roman Empire Captain George Vancouver is first Englishman to enter San Francisco Bay

Historic Publication

Nov 25 Benjamin Banneker first publishes his Farmer's Almanac

    George Washington re-elected as US President 1st cremation in US: Henry Laurens France's King Louis XVI goes on trial, accused of high treason and crimes against the state

Event of Interest

Dec 12 In Vienna, Ludwig van Beethoven (22) receives 1st lesson in music composition from Franz Joseph Haydn


1792: The White House was Built by Black Slaves and European Immigrants

There was no opening ceremony the construction was started without fanfare. Interestingly, the White House was mostly built by black slaves, and partly by European immigrants, most of whom didn’t have U.S. citizenship.

The White House was designed by James Hoban, a man of Irish nationality. The construction lasted for around 8 years and cost 232,371 dollars and 83 cents (the U.S. dollar had a much higher value than it has today).

President George Washington personally selected Hoban’s project, but the house was somewhat broadened according to Washington’s wishes, so as to be more becoming of a head of state. Thus, the number of bay windows was increased from 9 to 11.

However, George Washington did not wait for the White House to be completed. Namely, he resigned from the position of president before then. Washington’s successor, John Adams, was the first president to reside in the White House.

It is important to note that the White House came into use only some 10 or so years after it was completed. At first, it was called the “Presidential Palace” or simply the “President’s House”.


Historical Events on October 13

    Battle of Steppes: Hugh Pierrepont, Bishop of Liège & Louis II, Count of Loon defeat Henry I, Duke of Brabant Nichiren Daishonin, founder of the Nichiren School of Buddhism, dies, his ashes are interred at Taisekiji Temple. French King Philip IV has Grand Master Jacques de Molay and Knights Templar arrested and charged of idolatry and corruption

Royal Coronation

1399 Henry of Bolingbroke is crowned King Henry IV of England in Westminster Abbey, a few weeks after deposing Richard II

    Rabbi Issac Abarbanel starts his exegesis on Bible English admiral Sir Edward Poynings' fleet occupies Lock

Treaty of Interest

1501 Maximilian of Austria & Louis XII of France sign Treaty of Trente

Event of Interest

1536 Pilgrimage of Grace begins in Northern England, protest against King Henry VIII's break with the Pope

    Dutch West Indies Co grants religious freedom in West Indies Prince of Condé flees Paris Major general John Lambert drives out English Rump government Absolute monarchy instituted by decree in Denmark by King Frederik III Dutch and English troops occupy Liège

Event of Interest

1716 Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI's troops occupy Temesvar in Romania

Historic Publication

1724 Jonathan Swift publishes last of Drapier's letters

Event of Interest

1773 The Whirlpool Galaxy discovered by astronomer Charles Messier

    First US Navy forms when Continental Congress orders construction of a naval fleet "Old Farmer's Almanac" is 1st published and edited by Robert Thomas Cornerstone laid for the Executive Mansion (White House) in Washington Battle of Queenstown Heights: British forces defeat United States forces attempting to invade Canada B'nai B'rith founded (NY) Texas ratifies a state constitution 1st aerial photo taken in US (from a balloon) of Boston Skirmish at Blountsville, Tennessee (50 casualties) Battle at Darbytown Road, Virginia (337 casualties) Battle of Dalton, GA - surrendered

Battle of Interest

1864 Battle of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia (Mosby's Raid)

    Maryland voters adopt new constitution, including abolition of slavery Gustav Mahler (10) gives his 1st public piano concert The Delphic Fraternity is founded as the Delphic Society at the State Normal School in Geneseo, New York. Revival of Hebrew language as Eliezer Ben-Yehuda & friends agree to use Hebrew exclusively in their conversations

Agreement of Interest

1902 US President Theodore Roosevelt threatens to start using army troops to work coal mines struck since 12 may this brings the owners to agree to abide by a Commission of Arbitration

    Boston Americans win the inaugural Baseball World Series beat Pittsburgh Pirates 3-0 in Game 8 at Huntington Avenue for a 5-3 series victory winning pitcher Bill Dinneen Victor Herbert and by Glen MacDonough's operetta "Babes in Toyland" premieres at Majestic Theater, New York City The Belgian government in exile installed at St Adresse at Le Havre Boston Braves sweep Philadelphia A's, 1st sweep in World Series history Garrett Morgan patents his safety hood device, which would later be refined into the gas mask Pro-German Boers begin opposition to British authority in South Africa Boston Red Sox beat Philadelphia Phillies, 4 games to 1 in 12th World Series Soviets accept establishment of Petrograd Military 70,000 people gather to see 'Miracle of the Sun', solar visions reportedly by the Virgin Mary in Fátima, Portugal after prophecies by local children World Series celebration in Wade Park brings out 50,000+ Clevelanders NY Giants beat NY Yankees, 5 games to 3 in 18th World Series Angora (Ankara) becomes Turkey's capital

Event of Interest

1924 Mecca falls without struggle to Saudi forces led by Abdulaziz Ibn Saud


George Washington lays the cornerstone of the White House

On this day in history, October 13, 1792, George Washington lays the cornerstone of the White House. President John Adams would be the first American president to live in the presidential mansion in Washington DC. Today’s White House, however, looks very different than the building that was originally constructed.

After Congress decided to locate the federal capital along the Potomac River in 1790, Pierre Charles L’Enfant was chosen to design a plan for the federal city. Part of the plan included space for a massive mansion, five times the size of the house that was eventually rebuilt.

In 1791, a public request was put out by President George Washington for potential designs for the president’s mansion. Irish architect James Hoban’s design was eventually chosen. Hoban had designed the Charleston County Courthouse in Charleston, South Carolina, a building Washington had seen when he visited there. Washington liked the courthouse’s design and Hoban’s plans for the presidential house looked very similar.

On October 13, 1792, Washington laid the cornerstone for the White House. The original home did not have the circular south portico or the northern drive under portico that Americans recognize today. Instead, both the north and south sides of the White House had only a series of eleven windows on 2 floors.

After the White House was burned in 1814 by the British, the building was mostly reconstructed. The familiar rounded south portico was added in 1824 and the north portico in 1830. The White House’s West Wing was not added until 1901 by President Teddy Roosevelt for more office space. President William Howard Taft built the first Oval Office there in 1909. The East Wing was first added by President Roosevelt, but has gone through several iterations, including time as a greenhouse and a cloakroom.

The White House was entirely gutted during the administration of President Harry Truman. A steel frame was placed inside the outer walls and all the inner walls were replaced. Today, the White House has six stories, 2 underground, a ground floor, the State Floor, Second Floor and Third Floor. The entire White House complex also has the East and West Wings for offices, the Blair House for guests and the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which houses more presidential offices.

National Society Sons of the American Revolution

"[I]t is proper you should understand what I deem the essential principles of our Government…. Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever persuasion, religious or political."
Thomas Jefferson, 1801

Refresh your browser if you don't see today's post or click on the eagle at the top of the page


This Day in History: Oct. 13

In 1957, CBS-TV broadcast “The Edsel Show,” a one-hour live special starring Bing Crosby designed to promote the new, ill-fated Ford automobile. (It was the first special to use videotape technology to delay the broadcast to the West Coast.)

1775: The United States Navy had its origins as the Continental Congress ordered the construction of a naval fleet.

1792: The cornerstone of the Executive Mansion, later known as the White House, was laid during a ceremony in the District of Columbia.

1843: The Jewish organization B'nai B'rith was founded in New York City.

1932: President Herbert Hoover and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes laid the cornerstone for the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.

1944: During World War II, American troops entered Aachen, Germany.

1962: Edward Albee's four-character drama “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” opened on Broadway.


Watch the video: History behind Today # October 13


Comments:

  1. Quang

    You cannot undo what has been done. What's done is done.

  2. Irus

    And it is effective?

  3. Cermak

    A very good thing

  4. Beorhthram

    you express it perfectly

  5. Kleef

    I can not take part now in discussion - it is very occupied. I will be free - I will necessarily write that I think.



Write a message