Yorkshire Light Infantry guard railway junction, Dublin 1914

Yorkshire Light Infantry guard railway junction, Dublin 1914


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Yorkshire Light Infantry guard railway junction, Dublin 1914

One of the many German misjudgements in the period before the outbreak of war in 1914 was the belief that Britain would be too distracted by the crisis in Ireland and wouldn't want to get involved on the Continent. Here we see evidence of that crisis, with a detachment of the Yorkshire Light Infantry guarding a railway junction in Dublin, in or just before 1914.


John Smith

Private John Smith, 12/1063, 12th (Service) Battalion (Miners) (Pioneers), King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry,

John Smith was born in Manchester about 1880 and may have originated from the Miles Platting, Newton Heath area of the city, which was, at that time, incorporated in the Prestwich registration district. John Smith married Lilian Brown in summer 1901 in the same part of Manchester and the couple had three children, Amy (born March 13th 1902), Edith (born 1904-05) and Arthur (born 1906-07) all of whose births were registered in the same Prestwich district.

It has not been possible with any accuracy to discover the names of John’s parents or of his whereabouts between the year of his birth and 1901. It is known that he moved to Ossett after 1907 and by 1911 he was living at 7, Chancery Lane with his wife Lillian and their three surviving children of five born to the marriage. John was working as a hewer in a local pit.

John Smith’s army service record appears not to have survived but it is known that he enlisted in Dewsbury when, unsurprisingly, he was posted to the 12th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (Miners) (Pioneers) Regiment also known as "t’owd twelfth".

The history of the 12th Service Battalion (Miners)(Pioneers) King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry dates from the 5th September 1914 when the War Office authorised the West Yorkshire Coalowners Association to raise a Miners Battalion for the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) . After beginning its life at Leeds, the battalion trained first at Farnley Park, Otley and then at Burton Leonard, near Ripon. By this time it had been allocated to 31st Division as its pioneer battalion. After completing its training in Yorkshire, the battalion moved to Fovant, Salisbury in October 1915 before embarking for Egypt on 6th December. After little more than two months in Egypt, the 12th K.O.Y.L.I. was ordered to France in March 1916 to take part in the planned summer offensive on the Somme.

An early solution to the vast demand for labour to support the war effort was to create in each infantry Division a battalion that would be trained and capable of fighting as infantry, but that would normally be engaged on labouring work. They were given the name of "Pioneers". They differed from normal infantry in that they would be composed of a mixture of men who were experienced with picks and shovels (i.e. miners, road men, etc) and some who had skilled trades (smiths, carpenters, joiners, bricklayers, masons, tinsmiths, engine drivers and fitters). A Pioneer battalion would also carry a range of technical stores that infantry would not. This type of battalion came into being with an Army Order in December 1914. In early 1916, a number of infantry battalions composed of men who were medically graded unfit for the fighting were formed for labouring work. They had only 2 officers per battalion. Twelve such battalions existed in June 1916.

Because his army service record has not survived it is not possible with any certainty to determine the precise date when he enlisted, at Dewsbury. A comparison of his service number, 12/1063, with other men whose 12th battalion K.O.Y.L.I. service records have survived indicate that he may have enlisted in spring 1915.

His Medal Index Card indicates that he embarked for Egypt on the 22nd December 1915 some two weeks or so after the 12th battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry left for Egypt on the 6th December 1915. After little more than two months in Egypt, the 12th K.O.Y.L.I. was ordered to France in March 1916 to take part in the planned summer offensive on the Somme.

On 1st July 1916 the 12th KOYLI were part of the 31st (Pals) Division which included the Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Barnsley, Hull, Durham and Accrington Pals. 1st July 1916, was the first day of The Battle of The Somme when the British forces suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 fatalities. In a single day.

The following words about this day and the "t’owd twelfth" are reproduced from The History of The King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry In The Great War 1914-1918 by Lt-Col.Reginald C. Bond, D.S.O.

"Lt-Col E.L.Chambers was in command of the battalion whose HQ was in Bus-les-Artois, about 10 miles north of Albert. By the 20th June 1916 preparations for the attack on the German line were in full swing in the division, and the companies of the Pioneer battalion were allotted: Company "A" to the 94th Infantry Brigade, Company "D" to the 93rd, while Companies "B" and "C" were detailed for work connected with clearing out the German communication trenches leading to the line which it was hoped to capture in the first bound.

When a division entered upon a general attack, there was no vast distinction made between an infantry soldier and a pioneer infantry man the ordinary soldier carried 220 rounds of ammunition, the pioneer carried 170 rounds plus a pick or a shovel their other impediments were very much the same in detail.

The troops of the division allotted to the successive waves wore distinguishing strips of coloured cloth tied to the right shoulder strap. This practice was universally adopted at this period of the war and ensured that each individual knew the objective which he was to reach during the course of the attack. The successive waves passed through each other, and thus the objectives which were first captured were consolidated, while fresh troops went forward to the later objectives.

At 5.50 am on the 1st July all companies were present in their assembly posts. The official account of the 12th battalion’s experiences written in their regimental war diary for 1st July 1916 simply states:

'Battalion reported present in assembly posts at 5.50am Battalion reassembled at assembly posts at 4.30pm Casualties sustained: 1 officer killed, 3 wounded, 188 other ranks killed and wounded.'

Such a diary demands amplification for this record. The 94th and 93rd Infantry Brigades, to which "A" and "D" companies of the 12th battalion were allotted in the attack had Serre for their objectives. At 7.30 the whistles blew each brigade went over the top in waves on a front of two companies the left brigade of the Fourth Army was the 94th Infantry Brigade. They were met by a destructive fire from the German infantry (who had been sheltered from our artillery barrage), from numerous machine-guns, and, most serious of all, from an immense concentration of heavy guns, especially from the direction of Bucquoy, east of Hebuterne, on their left front.

“These guns formed successive lines of barrage with shrapnel and high explosives one of them being about 200 yards behind the British line, to cut off the supports another 50 yards behind another 50 yards in front and a fourth of shrapnel which was under observed control, and followed the troops in their movements. The advanced lines of assault were able in most cases to get through before these barrages were effectively established, but they made it difficult, deadly, and often impossible, for the lines who then followed.

The companies of the 12th K.O.Y.L.I. had their duties to perform among "the lines who then followed.”

The waves of the attack melted under the hail of metal they advanced at the only pace they were permitted – the quick time, never the double. Those "who followed" had to rebuild trenches that were crumbling under heavy gunfire, forward supplies of ammunition, dig new trenches, and help in the later hours to save some of the wounded. That these duties did not render them immune from danger to life is obvious from their casualty list: that they found opportunities of displaying high military qualities. "

The following extracts are taken from The Battleground Europe series "Somme Serre" by Jack Horsfall & Nigel Cave:

"Dispersed amongst all the battalions in both brigades were 12/KOYLI (T’Owd Twelfth) mainly miners and many from Charlesworth Pit who had streamed into Leeds from the surrounding villages in 1914.Whole shifts marched together to enlist, shepherded in by regular sergeants in uniform who coaxed others out of the pubs as they went, until eventually arriving at the railway station to be put on board trains taking them into Farnley Camp at Otley. These men’s heroic but unsung tasks was to suffer the annihilating bombardment and machine gun fire of the Germans while rebuilding shattered trenches and bridges and keeping the communication trenches clear of the awful obstructions brought about by the atrocious weight of the shelling. They had to bring out the wounded clear those who had died and bury many on the spot on the trench floor. They had to fetch and carry barbed wire, stakes, water, food and anything that was required by the infantrymen, such as ammunition, grenades and mortar bombs- the whole without any opportunity of their own to have a go at the enemy.

"C" Company and three platoons of "B" Company from 12/KOYLI the Pioneers battalion, had gone into action with 93 Brigade. They had worked like demons in supporting and succouring their battered comrades. They made endless , blood soaked journeys back and forth with dead and wounded they had re-dug, shored up and cleared collapsed trenches and dugouts they had buried remains of men in the bottom of trenches and all the while had to do this under a rain of death falling about them.

At mid-morning, because the Pioneers were the only battalion resembling a coherent force, they were ordered to act as infantry in the face of the expected German attack and took up defensive positions along the Divisions right boundary in Sackville Street. It was here that the remnants of 12/KOYLI were positioned to form a defensive line facing Serre in case of a German counter attack.

. the divisional pioneers had lost 192 – men who were not there to fight with anything more offensive than a shovel had lost a third of their complement."

And so it was that Private 12/1063 John Smith met his death on the first day of 1st July 1916, the first day of The Battle of The Somme. The bloodiest day in British military history. The day when the British forces suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 fatalities. By way of context, should it be needed, the population of Ossett in 1911 was 14,078.

He was posthumously awarded the British and the Victory medals for his service overseas in a theatre of war. His relatively short service in Egypt before the 31st December 1915 also qualified him for the award of the 1914-1915 Star Medal.

Private John Smith, service number 12/1063, 12th Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry was killed in action on July 1st 1916. He is buried at Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, Somme, France at cemetery reference I.D.17. Colincamps is a village 11 kilometres north of Albert.

Colincamps and "Euston", a road junction a little east of the village, were within the Allied lines before the Somme offensive of July 1916. The cemetery was started as a front line burial ground during and after the unsuccessful attack on Serre on 1 July, but after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917 it was scarcely used. It was briefly in German hands towards the end of March 1918, when it marked the limit of the German advance, but the line was held and pushed forward by the New Zealand Division allowing the cemetery to be used again for burials in April and May 1918.

The cemetery is particularly associated with three dates and engagements the attack on Serre on 1 July 1916 the capture of Beaumont-Hamel on 13 November 1916 and the German attack on the 3rd New Zealand (Rifle) Brigade trenches before Colincamps on 5 April 1918. The whole of Plot I, except five graves in the last row, represents the original cemetery of 501 graves. After the Armistice, more than 750 graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields and other small cemeteries.

The UK Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects reveals that Private John Smith’s unspent army pay and allowances of £3 8s 3d was left to his widow and sole legatee, Lilian Smith in October 1916. A War Gratuity of £7 was also paid to her in July 1919.

John Smith was not remembered on any Ossett Roll of Honour or Memorial and neither has an Ossett Observer obituary for him been discovered. Private John Smith will be remembered on November 11th 2018 when his name, engraved at the Ossett War Memorial in the Market Place, will be unveiled.

1. "Serre Somme" by Jack Horsfall & Nigel Cave Battleground Europe ISBN 0 85052 508 X


What information do the records contain?

Some diaries record little more than daily losses and map references whilst others are much more descriptive, with daily reports on operations, intelligence summaries and other material. The digitised diaries cover activity in France and Belgium.

The diaries sometimes contain information about particular people but they are unit diaries, not personal diaries. A few contain details about awards of the Military Medal and the Meritorious Service Medal.

Many maps and plans were included in the original diaries but some confidential material was removed before the files were made available. This accounts for the absence of some appendices referred to on the covers of many diaries.


Vintage Photographs - Home Front

This section of the website contains archive photographs taken during, before and after the war. Specifically this sub-section contains photos of service on the various home fronts of the war.

Click here to read introductory notes relating to this section, including information on photograph sources. Use the sidebar to the right to select other categories of photos available within this section.

The photos reproduced below are in thumbnail format - simply click a given photograph to view a larger copy within a separate window.

House damaged by shellfire at Lowestoft (GW) French crowds welcome decorated Anzac troops at Marseille (GW)
Wrecked convalescent home at Lowestoft - the Matron's Room (GW) 5,000 women waiting for bread at the Hotel de Ville at Malines (FF)
Motor-transport waggon passing the Colosseum in Rome (GWS) Protective measures for the statue of Bartolommeo Colleoni (GWS)
Effects of an anti-German demonstration in Milan, 1915 (GWS) "The Horses of St. Mark" moved from Venice to a place of safety (GWS)
Palace of the Doges, Venice, protected by sandbags (GWS) Palace of the Doges, Venice, protected by sandbags (GWS)
Doges' Palace in Venice strengthened by solid pillars of brickwork (GWS) Initial mobilisation in an Italian town, April 1915 (GWS)
Wounded German soldiers receiving money from the Berlin army pay office (GWS) German soldiers receiving Russian language training in Berlin (GWS)
The new cathedral and the royal palace, Berlin (GWS) Removing the Imperial Insignia from the German Embassy, London, 1914 (GWS)
Berlin crowds witnessing a parade of captured Allied weaponry (GWS) Children with metal kitchen instruments to a Berlin collection depot (GWS)
German high-explosive shells being packed in wicker baskets (GWS) Maimed German soldiers learning to write with their left hand (GWS)
Berlin children being cared for while their parents are off on service (GWS) Red Cross nurses distributing gifts to German soldiers off to the Front (GWS)
German civilians donating gold rings to government officials (GWS) Berlin govt staff sifting through donated gold and silver jewellery (GWS)
Piles of plate and jewellery donated by Berlin civilians to the govt (GWS) Guard at a bombarded French village with their Mayor (GWS)
Wounded French soldiers at the national fete day, 14 July 1915 (GWS) The British Houses of Parliament viewed from the Embankment (GWS)
British New Army recruits in trench training in Aldershot (GWS) Members of the British National Guard in training (GWS)
British New Army recruits in trench training in Aldershot (GWS) Lord Kitchener calling for more British recruits, London, 9 July 1915 (GWS)
Highland officers in training north of the Tweed (GWS) Newley decorated V.C.'s leaving Buckingham Palace (GWS)
Grenadiers at sniping practice on Wimbledon Common (GWS) Members of the British Inns of Courts Officers Training Corps (GWS)
Troops assisting in the harvest fields in Kent (GWS) Haymaking in France (GWS)
Haymaking in France (GWS) The Lord-Provost of Edinburgh at an inspection (GWS)
Troops assisting in the harvest fields in Kent (GWS) King George V and his staff on Salisbury Plain at Stonehenge (GWS)
A Paris anti-aircraft gun and its crew (GWS) General view of Moscow (GWS)
The Nevsky Prospect, Petrograd (GWS) Yorkshire light infantry guarding a Dublin railway in 1914 (GWS)
British Territorials guarding the railway at Rochester (GWS) German civilians cheering Kaiser Wilhelm II in August 1914 (GWS)
Shop bearing German and Austrian names destroyed in Paris (GWS) Crowds gathering outside the Bank of England at the start of the war (GWS)
A run on a Paris savings bank at the start of the war (GWS)

Saturday, 22 August, 2009 Michael Duffy

A Kite Balloon was an observation balloon controlled by a cable from the ground.

- Did you know?


Born John Francis, son of John and Margaret Forde nee Rourke. His father, born in Co. Galway, was a constable in the RIC and later an insurance agent. His mother was born in Co. Wexford. Later resided at Patrick Square, Wexford.
A clerical worker in the Pierce Ironworks Foundry in Wexford, Frank joined up aged 16. In early August 1916, he arrived in France and fought at the Battle of the Somme. However, just a few weeks before his 17th birthday, Frank was grievously wounded during the Battle of the Somme and died while being brought back from the trenches for medical attention. His platoon commander, Lieutenant A.W. Henchy wrote to Frank's parents and called him 'a fine courageous fellow and a gallant soldier of whom his family should be proud'. Frank was buried in Trachee de Mecknes Cemetary in the Pas de Calais in France. In his military will, he left everything he possessed to his mother.


Mayor Dominick Kelly

Major Dominick Kelly was born in Clonina, Cree Co Clare in April 1915. At the age of nine he was taken to Paris to live with his Aunt. He later moved to London and during the Second world war he operated under cover in France. Now retired, he lives in a suburb of Brussels where he settled after the war.

My aunt was governess to the family of the Duc de Massa who lived on the Avenue des Champs Elysées. It was hard to imagine a scene further from Clonina, all silverware and servants with the best of everything! I thought I had landed on the moon at first but I quickly settled in, and soon was speaking perfect french.

After I finished school, I trained to be a teacher, but then I decided it wasn’t for me and went to London where I joined the Metropolitan Police. It was while I was on the beat that I met my future wife, Zizi.

When war broke out I joined the Army and, because of my language skills, I was transferred to the Special Operations Executive. In 1943 I was parachuted into occupied France, and operating undercover, I set up an evacuation line from Brussels to Madrid. Later I found myself in Belgium organising air drops of guns and ammunition. After the war I worked as a Public Prosecutor for the Allied administration in Germany. I was demobilised in 1949 and settled in Brussels.

I worked for a Belgium investment bank for several years, then embarked on a career in business. I retired in 1981. My dear wife Zizi died some years ago and now I live alone. But I have wonderful neighbours and friends and my children and grandchildren come to see me when they can. Sometimes when I look at them I see again that barefoot little boy back in Co Clare, setting out for Paris and life’s great adventure.

Note.
The SOE was the most secret of organisations, set up at the instigation of Winston Churchill in 1940. It was an amalgamation of three secret organisations, and during it’s existence seems to have had an acrimonious relationship with all arms of the War Department.


Marshal Foch’s Tribute to the Irish Soldiers who died in the First World War.

PARIS, FRIDAY, Nov. 9th, 1928

THE Heroic Dead of Ireland have every right to the homage of the living for they proved in some of the heaviest fighting of the world war that the unconquerable spirit of the Irish race— the spirit that has placed them among the world’s greatest soldiers—still lives and is stronger than ever it was.

I had occasions to put to the test the valour of the Irishmen serving in France, and, whether they were Irishmen from the North or the South, or from one party or another, they did not fail me.

Some of the hardest fighting in the terrible days that followed the last offensive of the Germans fell to the Irishmen, and some of their splendid regiments had to endure ordeals that might justly have taxed to breaking-point the capacity of the finest troops in the world.

Never once did the Irish fail me in those terrible days. On the Somme, in 1916, I saw the heroism of the Irishmen of the North and South, I arrived on the scene shortly after the death of that very gallant Irish gentleman, Major William Redmond. I saw Irishmen of the North and the South forget their age-long differences, and fight side by side, giving their lives freely for the common cause.

In war there are times when the necessity for yielding up one’s life is the most urgent duty of the moment, and there were many such moments in our long drawn- out struggle. Those Irish heroes gave their lives freely, and, in honouring then I hope we shall not allow our grief to let us forgot our pride in the glorious heroism of these men.

They have left to those who come after a glorious heritage and an inspiration to duty that will live long after their names are forgotten. France will never forget her debt to the heroic Irish dead, and in the hearts of the French people to-day their memory lives as that of the memory of the heroes of old, preserved in the tales that the old people tell to their children and their children’s children.

I know of no better tribute to Irish valour than that paid after the armistice by one of the German High Command, whom I had known in happier days. I asked him if he could tell me when he had first noted the declining moral of his own troops, and he replied that it was after the picked troops under his command had had repeated experience of meeting the dauntless Irish troops who opposed them in the last great push that was expected to separate the British and French armies, and give the enemy their long-sought victory.

The Irishmen had endured such constant attacks that it was thought that they must be utterly demoralised, but always they seemed to find new energy with which to attack their assailants, and in the end the flower of the German Army withered and faded away as an effective force.

When the moment came for taking the offensive all along our line, it was these same worn Irish troops that we placed in the van, making call after call on their devotion, but never finding them fail us. In the critical days of the German offensive, when it was necessary that lives should be sacrificed by the thousand to slow down the rush of the enemy, in order that our harassed forces should have time to reform, it was on the Irish that we relied repeatedly to make these desperate stands, and we found them responding always.

Again and again, when the bravest were necessary to delay the enemy’s advance, it was the Irish who were ready and at all times the soldiers of Ireland fought with the rare courage and determination that has always characterised the race on the battlefield.

Some of the flower of Irish chivalry rests in the cemeteries that have been reserved in France, and the French people will always have these reminders of the debt that France owes to Irish valour. We shall always see that the graves of these heroes from across the sea are lovingly tended, and we shall try to ensure that the generations that come after us shall never forget the heroic dead of Ireland.

In August 1914 World War 1 began. It pitted Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire and other nations against the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, France, Russia and their allies. Canada enlisted 625,000 military personnel by 1918. Most served in the Canadian Corps. America declared for the allies and joined the war in April 1917.One in seven died. The war in Europe lasted till the armistice was signed on 11 th hour of the 11 th day of the 11th month, 1918. The war in Russia continued for some time after.

This is our way of showing some recognition for our fallen kinsmen in the “Great War”. We will try and make it as comprehensive as possible. Of the 215,000 Irishmen who took part 35,000 did not return.

Were these the last of the "Wild Geese"

Private I. Kelly, Royal Marine Light Infantry, died August 6, 1914.

Private R. O’Kelley, 3/13552, 2nd Bat., South Wales Borderers, died on Tuesday August 24, 1915. He is buried in 11. H. 138 East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, Greece.

Private S. Kelly, 8695, Hampshire Regiment, died on August 25, 1914.

Private A. Kelly, 2888, 2nd Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Wednesday August 26, 1914. He is buried in 1. B. 9 Fontaine-Au-Pire Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.

Private W. Kelly, 793, 2nd Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Wednesday August 26, 1914. He is buried in 1. Esnes Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.


September 1914

Private James Kelly, 1888, age 30, No 5 Coy. 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Monday September 14, 1914 and is commemorated on La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et-Marne, France. He was son of Peter and Mary Kelly, 34 Convent Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. He was brother of Private William Kelly, Irish Guards, who died on November 9, 1914 (See Below).

Private T. A. Kelly, 10547, age 24, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, died on September 14, 1914.

Private Robert Kelly, 9338, 2nd Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Thursday September 17, 1914. He is commemorated on La-Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Private J. H. Kelly, 11175, Border Regiment, died September 19, 1914.

Private G. Kelly, CH/2399, age 47, Royal Marine Light Infantry, died September 22, 1914.

Private William Kelly, 2903, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Tuesday September 22, 1914 and is commemorated on La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et Marne, France.

Private W. Kelley, 13572, age 20, 3rd Bat., Sherwood Foresters (Notts. and Derby Regiment), died on Sunday September 27. He was son of Mary Ann and the late John Kelley, 17 Prior Well Road, Worksop, Notts. He was a native of Ranby, Retford, Notts. He is buried in Church C. 4651 Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, Devon.

Lance Corporal J. Kelly, 8686, 1st Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Sunday September 27, 1914. He is buried in 1. B. 7 Vailly British Cemetery, Aisne, France.

October 1914

Private Thomas Kellie, 1990, age 20, 1st Bat., King’s Own (Royal Lancashire Regiment), died on Tuesday October 13, 1914. He was son of Mr and Mrs. James McRae Kellie, Charleston St., Walworth, London. He is commemorated on Panel 2 Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Private A. J. Kelly, L/9742, age 30, Middlesex Regiment, died on October 15, 1914.

Corporal B. Kelly, 6784, Scots Guards, died on October 26, 1914.

Private P. Kelly, 1402, Royal Scots, died October 15, 1914.

Private Denis Kelly, 10732, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died of wounds, on Friday October 16, 1914 and is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery (1 D. 9.), Pas de Calais, France. He was born in St. Marys, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. [See Patrick Kelly, 6674, Leinster Regiment, died on August 31, 1916]. [Bethune Cemetery contains 3,004 Commonwealth burials including 26 men of 1st/8th Manchester Regiment. Bethune was comparatively free from bombardment and remained an important railway and hospital centre as well as corps and divisional headquarters. The 33rd Casualty and Clearing Station were in the town until the end of 1917. In early 1918 Bethune began to suffer from constant shell fire and in April 1918 German forces reached Locon, 5 Km to the north. The bombardment of May 21, 1918 did great damage to the town and it was not until October that pressure from the Germans relaxed. The Commonwealth part of the cemetery was designed by Sir Edward Lutyens.]

Private E. Kelly, 9694, ALIAS, died October 18, 1914.

Private J. Kelly, 6625, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Sunday October 18, 1914 and is buried in Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery, Armentieres, Nord, France.

Private J. Kelly, 5877, age 34, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died on October 18, 1914.

Bandsman David Kelly, 6999, age 29, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on Monday October 19, 1914 and is commemorated on Menin Gate Merial, Leper (Ypres), Belgium. He was husband of Catherine Kelly, Whitrigg Cottage, Kirkbride, Cumberland, England.

Private Mark Kelly, 5870, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on Monday October 19, 1914. He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Michael Kelly, 5177, age 26, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on October 19. He was son of Michael and Nora Kelly, Long Lane, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary, and was husband of Ellen Kelly, Rackham St., Carrick-on-Suir. He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial Pas de Calais.

Private Michael Kelly, 10711, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on October 19. He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private F. Kelly, 4301, age 23, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died on October 19.

Private Patrick Kelly, 5532, age 40, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on October 19, 1914. He was son of the late Pat and Bridget Kelly. He served in the Tirah Campaign (1897-8). He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private G. E. Kelly, 10928, ALIAS, died on October 20, 1914.

Private Joseph Kelly, 7894, 2nd Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Tuesday October 20, 1914, and is commemorated on panel 10, Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Private Patrick Kelly (served as Considine), 6205, age 35, 2nd Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Tuesday October 20, 1914 and is commemorated on Ploegsteet Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. He was son of Patrick Kelly of Lifford, Ennis, Co. Clare.

Private William Kelly, 9846, 2nd Bat., Leinster Regiment, who died on Tuesday October 20, 1914 and is commemorated on Panel 10, Ploegsteet Memorial Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Private B. D. Kelly, 10839, 3rd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on Wednesday October 21, 1914 and is buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. [St. Omer, a town 45 Km south east of Calais. On October 13, 1914 it became the General Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force and remained so until March 1916. Lord Roberts died there in November 1914. It had a considerable hospital centre especially in 1918 and was raided by German planes in November 1917 and May 1918, with serious loss of life.]

Private Patrick William Kelly, 7591, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Saturday, October 21, 1914, and is commemorated on Panel 5, Ploegsteer Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Lance Corporal A. Kelly, 9127, age 22, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), died October 23, 1914.

Private James Kelly, 10436, 2nd Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Friday October 23, 1914. He is commemorated on Panel 19 and 33 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private Martin Kelly, 4312, age 24, 2nd Bat., Connaught Rangers, killed in action on Friday October 23, 1914 and is commemorated on Panel 42, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Born in Creagh, Ballinasloe, he was son of Mr and Mrs Andrew Kelly, Harbour St., Ballinasloe, Co. Galway. Decoration, Mons Star.

Private David Kelly, 9540, 2nd Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Saturday October 24, 1914. He is commemorated on Panel 19 and 33 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Captain Harry Holdsworth Kelly, age 34, 38th Field Coy., Royal Engineers, died on Saturday October 24, 1914 and is buried in grave VII. B. 32, Ration Farm Military Cemetery, La Chapelle-D’Armentieres, Nord France. He was son of Lt. Colonel Henry Holdsworth Kelly and Elizabeth Eleanor Kelly (nee Column), 18 St. Andrew’s Road, South Sea. He was brother of the future General Henry Theo Kelly, died 1932, Admiral Sir John D. Kelly, died 1936 and Admiral Sir Howard Kelly, died 1952. He also had very eminent sisters. [See Genealogy of For Admirals and a General]

Private A. Kelly, Scots Guards, died October 26, 1914.

Private E. Kelly, 7617, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Monday October 26, 1914 and is buried in Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery (grave IX. A. 42), Armentiers, Nord France.

Rifleman James Kelly, 6780, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Tuesday October 27, 1914 and is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private J. Kelly, 1854, age 23, King’s Own (Royal Lancashire Regiment, died on October 27, 1914.

Captain E. D. F. Kelly, 1st Life Guards, died on October 30, 1914.

November 1914

Leading Seaman Arthur Kelly, 211500, age 29, (RFR/PO/IC/16) H.M.S. “Good Hope”, Royal Navy (RN), died on Sunday November 1, 1914 and is commemorated on Panel 1, Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, England.

Private Edward Kelly, 8440, age 24, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Sunday, November 1, 1914.

He was son of Matthew and Kathleen Kelly, and husband of Maggie Long Kelly. He is commemorated on Panel 5, Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Cook’s Mate Geoffrey William Kelly, M/2427, H.M.S Monmouth, Royal Navy, died on Sunday, November 1, 1914 and is commemorated on Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon.

Ordinary Seaman H. Kelly, J/I6674, Royal Navy, died November 1, 1914.

Stoker 1st Class Thomas Kelly, 302040, (RFR/PO/B/3286), H.M.S. Good Hope, Royal Navy, died Sunday, on November 1, 1914 and is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, Panel 4.


2 nd November

Private G. Kelly, 8408, East Lancashire Regiment, died November 2, 1914.

Private Patrick Kelly, 4305, 2nd Bat., Connaught Rangers, died of wounds on Tuesday November 3, 1914 and is buried in grave 1. L. 45 in Poperinghe Old Military Cemetery, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was born in Kilclooney, Ballinasloe, Co. Galway .

Private Charles Kelly, 8984, 1st Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Wednesday November 4, 1914. He is commemorated on Panel 4 and 6 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private C. Kelly, 8984, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on November 4, 1914.

Private M. Kelly, 9323, age 24, 1st Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Thursday November 5, 1914 and is buried in grave 111. C. 17, Aubers Ridge British Cemetery, Aubers, Nord France.

Private Frances Kelly, 2777, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Friday November 6, 1914 and is commemorated on Pane 11, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial,, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Corporal J. Kelly, 1697, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Friday November 6, 1914 and is buried in Poperinghe Old Military Cemetery (Grave 1. L. 24), West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Lance Corporal Michael Kelly, 1936, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Friday November 6, 1914 and is commemorated on Panel 11, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private M. Kelly, 9386, age 25, North Staffordshire Regiment, died on November 7, 1914.

Private P. Kelly, 6303, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died Monday November, 9, 1914 and is buried in Strand Military Cemetery, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Private Thomas Kelly, 1889, age 32, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Monday November 9, 1914 and is buried in grave 1. L. 17, Poperinghe Old Military Cemetery, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of Peter and Mary Kelly, 34 Convent Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.

He was brother of Private James Kelly, Irish Guards who died on September 14, 1914 (See above).

Private J. Kelly, 7274, Cameron’s (Scottish Rifles), died on November 10, 1914.

Lance Corporal Peter Kelly, 9238, 1st Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Wednesday November 11, 1914. He is commemorated on Panel 36 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private M. Kelly, 6071, South Staffordshire Regiment, died on November 12, 1914.

Driver J. M. Kelly, T1/2134, age 24, Army Service Corps, died November 16, 1914.

Private T. Kelly, 9450, 2nd Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Wednesday November 18, 1914. He is buried in C. 24 Bailleul Communal Cemetery (Nord), Nord, France.

Private T. Kelly, 7300, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, died on November 21, 1914.

Lieutenant Colonel G. H. F. Kelly, age 44, 34th Sikh Pioneers, died November 23, 1914.

Private Joseph Kelly, 3/9283, 2nd Bat., Durham Light Infantry, died on Monday, November 23, 1914, and is commemorated on panel 8 and 9, Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.

Able Seaman Joseph Kelly, 230985, H.M.S. Bulwark, Royal Navy, died on Thursday, November 26, 1914. He was brother of Mrs Mary Ann Clough, 10 Charlton Street, Collyhurst St., Rochdale Rd., Manchester. He is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, Panel 2.

Private Patrick Kelly, 10273, age 21, 1st Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Monday November 23, 1914 and is buried in Arras Road Cemetery, Roclincourt, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of John and Hannagh (nee O’Brien) Kelly, 9 Blarney St., Cork.


December 1914

Private Samuel Kelley, PO/3793, age 45, H.M.S. “Kent”, Royal Marine Light Infantry, died on Tuesday December 8, 1914. He was husband of Kate E. Kelly, 62 Chevening Road, Kensal Rise, London. He was buried in grave 783 Stanley Cemetery, Falkland Islands.

Private D. Kelly, 9437, age 46, Scots Guards, died on December 18, 1914.

Private Francis Kelly, 11329, age 26, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday December 19, 1914. He was son of Michael and Janette Kelly (née Irving), 34 Parkhead Rows, Bellshill, Lanarkshire. He is commemorated on Panel 37 and 38, Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private J. Kelly, 10261, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday December 19, 1914. He is buried in IV. F. 19, Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, Pas de Calais, France.

Private John Kelly, 11934, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Monday December 21, 1914. He is commemorated on Panel 37 and 38 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Arthur Kelley, 11087, 1st Bat., Coldstream Guards, died on Tuesday December 22, 1914. He was son of William H. Kelley of 3 Barby Rd., Rugby. He is commemorated on Panel 2 and 3 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

December 25 th - Christmas Day.

Sergeant Thomas Kelly, 3096, age 37, 3rd Bat., Connaught Rangers, died of wounds, at home, on Friday, December 25, 1914, and is buried in Ballinasloe (Creagh) New Cemetery, Co. Galway. Born in Kilclooney, Ballinasloe. Awarded the 1914 star. Enlisted in Oranmore. Was formerly of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

1915

January 1915.

Stoker John Kelly, 1966T, age 34, Royal Naval Reserve, died on January, 1, 1915. He is commemorated on Chatham Naval Memorial, ref., 14.

Son of Patrick and Catherine Misset Kelly, of Hartlepool.

Lance Corporal T. Kelly, 5904, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on January 4, 1915. He is buried in Mon's Communal Cemetery, Hainaut, Belgium.

Seaman A. Kelly, 874X, age 24, Newfoundland Royal Naval Reserve, died January 13, 1915.

Private M. Kelly, 11167, Cameron’s (Scottish Rifles), died on January 14, 1915.

Private Michael Kelly, 3800, age 24, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Thursday January 14, 1915 and is buried in Pont-Du-Hem Military Cemetery (Grave V. G. 31), La Gorgue, Nord France. He was son of Mrs Johanna Kelly, 7 Keeffe St., Athlone, Co. Westmeath.

Private J. Kelly, 8152, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday January 16, 1915. He is buried in V. B. 5. Pont-du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorguen, Nord, France.

Private R. Kelly, 13888, age 48, South Wales Borderers, died on January 17, 1915.

Private John Kelly, 9356, Scots Guards, died on January 25, 1915. Commemorated on Panel 3 & 4 Le Touret Memorial. The Memorial in Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-l'Avoue, is one of those erected by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to record the names of the officers and men who fell in the Great War and whose graves are not known. It serves the area enclosed on the North by the river Lys and a line drawn from Estaires to Fournes, and on the South by the old Southern boundary of the First Army about Grenay and it covers the period from the arrival of the II Corps in Flanders in 1914 to the eve of the Battle of Loos. It does not include the names of officers and men of Canadian or Indian regiments they are found on the Memorials at Vimy and Neuve-Chapelle. No. of Identified Casualties: 13369

Private G. R. Kelly, S/39, age 34, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), died on January 27, 1915.

Private P. Kelly, 10115, 2nd Bat., Royal Munster Fusiliers, died on Friday January 29, 1915 and is buried in Chocques Military Cemetery (Grave 1. A. 9), Pas de Calais, France.

February 1915

Corporal J. Kelly, 6846, age 32, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died on February 4, 1915.

Son of Samuel and Margaret Kelly, of 30A, Queen Anne St., Liverpool. Buried in B. 4.

Bois-Grenier remained in British hands, though close to the front line, from October 1914 to April 1918, and the earliest British burials were made in the Communal Cemetery. There are now 121 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-18 war commemorated in this site. Of these, 8 are unidentified three in Row K, were brought in after the Armistice, from the North side of the village. There are also 4 unidentified French burials here. The British plots cover an area of 431 square meters. No. of Identified Casualties: 113

Lance Corporal Francis Kelly, 8952, age 33, 1st Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Thursday February 11, 1915 and is buried in grave 5, Dickebush Old Military Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of Francis and Nellie Kelly, Water Lane, Granard, Co. Longford.

Private Patrick Kelly, 3422, age 23, 1st Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Sunday February 14, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 44 on Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West- Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of William and Rose Kelly, Edenderry, King’s County (Co. Offaly).

Rifleman A. G. Kelly, 3044, age 35, 3rd Bat., Rifle Brigade, died on Tuesday February 16, 1915. He was son of Thomas Kelly and served in the South African Campaign. He is buried in K. 12. 10 Portsmouth (Eastney or Highland Road) Cemetery, Hampshire.

Private H. Kelly, 4945, age 18, Border Regiment, died on February 16, 1915.

Seaman J. Kelly, 3854/A, Royal Naval Reserve, died on February 20, 1915. He is buried in grave S. D. 434 Ardrosan Cemetery. He was on HMS “Thorn”.

Private A. Kelly, 9401, King’s Own (Lancashire Regiment), died February 20, 1915.

Airman 1st Class Robert Edward Kelly, 464, age 27, 4th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, died on Sunday February 20, 1915 and is buried in 1. A. 42 in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais. He was son of Edward and Lucy Kelly, 35 Seafort Avenue, Sandymount, Dublin.

Private G. Kelly, 9231, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Sunday February 21, 1915. He is buried in 11. F. 5 Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’Avoue, Pas de Calais, France.

Private J. Kelly, 10915, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Monday February 22, 1915, and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery, (Nord) (Grave J. 4), Nord France.

Private E. Kelly, 2418, age 23, King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment), died on February 23, 1915.

Private John Joseph Kelly, 4876, age 26, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Thursday February 25, 1915 and is buried in Grave IV. A. 28 Bethune Town Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. He was brother of James Kelly, 67 St. Columb’s Wells, Derry.

Rifleman J. Kelly, 10399, age 20, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Monday, March 1, 1915, son of William Kelly, 3 Frederick Lane, Belfast, and is buried in Loker Churchyard, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private T. Kelly, SS/5236, Army Service Corps, died on March 3, 1915.

Private D. Kelly, 8104, Yorkshire Regiment, died on March 4, 1915.

Private H. Kelly, 13901, Cameron’s (Scottish Rifles), died on March 10, 1915.

Fireman J. Kelly, Mercantile Marine Reserve, died on March 11, 1915.

Private J. Kelly, S/8140, age 43, Gordon Highlanders, died on March 11, 1915.

Petty Officer John Mathias Kelly, 1898D, age 34, Royal Naval Reserve, died on March 11, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 10 Portsmouth Naval Memorial. Was on the HMS “Bayano”.

Son of Matthias Kelly, of Peel, Isle of Man husband of Lena McCall Beattie Alexander (formerly Kelly), of 40, Dalmarnock Rd., Glasgow.

Rifleman James Kelly, 9813, 1st Bn., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Saturday, March 13, 1915, and is buried in Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. [He with seven of his R.I.R colleagues died that day]

Rifleman James Kelly, 5287, 2nd Bat., Rifle Brigade, died on Sunday March 14, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 44 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private H. J. Kelly, G/6343, Middlesex Regiment, died on March 14, 1915.

Rifleman Joseph Kelly, Z/963, age 28, 2nd Bat., Rifle Brigade, died on Sunday March 14, 1915. He was husband of Ellen Kelly, 54 Cannon St., Salford, Manchester. He is commemorated on Panel 44 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Denis Kelly. 8104. 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Died 14 March 1915.
Born Middlesbrough, Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Buried ESTAIRES COMMUNAL CEMETERY.
(Not shown on the Middlesbrough War Memorial)

Private J. Kelly, 8337, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Monday March 15, 1915. He is buried in 1. A. 59, Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Private W. M. Kelly, 1943, age 25, 2nd Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Monday March 15, 1915. He was son of Samuel Kelly, 29 South Wellington St., Dundee. He is buried in 1. A. 48 Chocques Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Edward Kelly, 10270, age 23, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on Monday March 15, 1915 and is commemorated on Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, leper, Belgium. He was son of Edward and Rose Kelly, 135 Townsend St., Dublin.

Private M. Kelly, 8862, age 25, Northamptonshire Regiment, died on March 16. Buried in grave III. H. 3. Estaires Communal Cemetery and Extension.

Son of Sarah E. Waywood (formerly Kelly), of 418, Gladstone St., Peterborough, and the late M. Kelly. Born at Ramsey, Hunts.

Estaires is a town and commune in the Department of the Nord, about 11 kilometers west of Armentieres. The Cemetery is on the eastern outskirts of the town and on the east side of the road to Bailleul.

The town was occupied by French cavalry on the 15th October, 1914, and passed at once into British hands. On the 10th April, 1918 it was captured by the enemy, after an obstinate defence by the 50th (Northumbrian) Division and it was finally retaken by British troops at the beginning of September, 1918. The town was a Field Ambulance centre as early as November, 1914, and later the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station was posted in it. It was later "adopted" by the County Borough of Plymouth. Estaires Communal Cemetery was used for British burials from the early days of November, 1914 to June, 1917, and two burials of September, 1918 are in Plot II, Row P. Estaires Communal Cemetery Extension was used from April, 1917 to April, 1918, and again in September-November, 1918. The Plots are numbered IV and V, in continuation of the numbering for the Communal Cemetery. The Portuguese graves of June-August, 1917 and two French graves were removed after the Armistice. A German Plot of 63 graves, made on the North side during the enemy occupation in 1918, has been removed. There are a total of 875 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war here, 63 of which are unidentified. There are 9 Commonwealth burials of the 1939-45 War, killed during the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Force to Dunkirk at the end of May 1940. There are also 14 Non Commonwealth burials in C.W.G.C. care. The five Plots cover an area of 3,336 square meters. No. of Identified Casualties: 835

Lance Corporal A. Kelly, 1454, age 26, Army Cyclist Corps, died March 25, 1915.

Stoker 1st Class W. L. Kelley, K/9685, age 22, Royal Navy, died on March 27, 1915.

Sergeant James Patrick Kelly, 8173, age 32, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Wednesday March 31, 1915 and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery (Grave 111. D. 72), Pas de Calais. He was son of Patrick and Jane Kelly.

Private M. Kelly, S/2421, Argyll and Southern Highlanders, died on April 1, 1915. Buried in grave R. 306 Aldershot Military Cemetery.

During both wars, numerous regimental and corps depots were based in and around Aldershot. At the outbreak of The First World War, it was the headquarters of the Aldershot Command and of the 1st and 2nd Divisions, and the Depot of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The North and South Camps, divided by the Basingstoke Canal, remained in full activity throughout the War. During the Second World War, some 400,000 Canadian servicemen were trained there. Aldershot Military Cemetery is a permanent military cemetery, the property of the Ministry of Defence. The Commission is responsible for the care of graves of both world wars within the cemetery. There are 690 First World War graves in the cemetery, the earliest bears the date 5th August 1914, and the latest 11th August 1921. Many of these graves are in plot AF. The 129 Second World War graves are in groups in various plots, the largest group in plot A containing 86 graves. No. of Identified Casualties: 855

Private E. H. Kelly, East Surrey Regiment, died April 2, 1915.

Stoker 2nd Class S. Kelly, K/23437,age 22, H.M.S. Magpie, Royal Navy, died on Friday, April 9, 1915. He is buried in Stoke-on-Trent (Tunstall) Cemetery, Staffordshire. GG. R.C. 14.

Private J. Kelly, 9834, 1st Bat., Cheshire Regiment, died on Saturday, April 17, 1915. He is buried in Tuileries British Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private M. Kelly, 9558, age 24, Leinster Regiment, died on died on April 19, 1915.

[In Biographical Dictionary of Tipperary by Martin O’Dwyer (1999), he refers to Private Martin Kelly, 16667, 1st Leinster Regiment, killed in action in France, April 19, 1915 who was born in Kilcommon, Co. Tipperary].

Second Lieutenant Esmonde Lawrence Kellie, age 20, Bedfordshire Regiment, died on Monday April 19, 1915. He was son of Lawrence and Gertrude Kellie, 191 Potsdown Road, Maida Vale, London. He is commemorated on Panel 31 and 33 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private Alfred Edward Kelly, 8113, age 38, Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment), died on Thursday April 22, 1915. He was son of Mathew Kelly. He is commemorated on Panel 10 - 26 - 28 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private Thomas Kelly, 10665, age 25, 4th Bat., Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Reg.), died on Friday April 23, 1915. He was son of Thomas H. Kelly. He is commemorated on Panel 18 -24 -26 - 30 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private T. E. Kelly, 10665, age 25, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment), died on April 23, 1915.

Major E. T. Kelly, 4th Bat., Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment), died on Saturday April 24, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 18 - 24 - 26 - 30 Ypres (Menin Gate), Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private P. Kelly, 24955, age 32, 13th Bat., Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment), died on Saturday April 24, 1915. He was son of the late Peter and Ciss Kelly, Zion House, Mallow, Co. Cork. He is commemorated on Panel 24 - 26 - 28 - 30 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Second Lieutenant George Edward Eccleston. Kelly, 2nd Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on April 25, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private Frank Kelly, 1384, 1st Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Sunday April 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private Lawrence Kelly, 10167, age 23, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Sunday April 25, 1915 and is commemorated on V. Beach Cemetery (Special Memorial B. 10), Turkey. He was son of James Kelly and his wife Kate Lawlor, Chapel Hill, Athy, Co. Kildare.

Private William Kelly, 132, 10th Bat., Australian Infantry, died on April 25, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private R. Kelly, 7095, age 33, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, died on April 25, 1915.

Lance Corporal Patrick Francis Kelly, 16757, 2nd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Monday April 26, 1915 and is commemorated on Menin Gate Memorial (Panel 44 and 46), Leper (Ypres), Belgium.

Sergeant Michael Kelly, 3434, age 27, Royal Irish Regiment, died on April 26, 1915. He was son of the late Joseph and Mary Kelly, Kilkenny, and husband of Bridget West (formerly Kelly, nee Saunders), Maudlin St., Kilkenny. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium.

Rifleman William Edward Kelly, 3402, 1st Bat., Rifle Brigade, died on Monday April 26, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 46 - 48 and 50 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Second Lieutenant P. E. Kelly, age 23, Middlesex Regiment, died on April 27, 1915.

Private Ernest Kelly, 1250, 5th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on April 27, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine, Memorial, Turkey.

Rifleman T. W. Kelly, 2259, age 24, Monmouthshire Regiment, died on April 28, 1915.

Private J. Kelly, 3558, age 23, 2nd Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Thursday April 29, 1915 and is buried in Divisional Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He as husband of Mrs Ellen McLoughlin (formerly Kelly), 39 Duncan Street, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire.

Private Michael Kelly, 7851, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on April 30, 1915. Commemorated on the Special Memorial, V Beach Memorial.

The Anzac and Sulva cemeteries are first signposted from the left hand junction of the Eceabat - Bigali Road. From this junction you travel into the main Anzac area. Follow the road to Helles opposite the Kabatepe Museum. After 14.2 km's, take a right turn at the 'T' junction and after 14.3 km's take the left fork. After a total of 23.8 km's you will find a short track to the cemetery which is on the beach. The Cemetery is at the bottom of the grassy slope that rises to the cliff edge between Sedd el Bahr village and Cape Helles.

Private Patrick Kelly, 11056, age 22, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Friday April 30, 1915 and is commemorated on Helles Memorial (Panel 190-196), Turkey. He was son of Peter and Bridget Kelly, Kilmurry, Kilbride, Co. Wicklow.

Private James Kelly, 7161, age 40, 1st Bat., Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment), died on Friday April 30, 1915. He was son of William and Mary Kelly and husband of Mary Lilian Todd (formerly Kelly), 70 St. Catherine’s St., St. Thomas, Ontario. He is commemorated on Panel 10 - 26 - 28 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private Joseph Kelly, 9372, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Friday April 30, 1915 and is commemorated on Special Memorial B. 9., V Beach Cemetery, Turkey.

Captain E. D. F. Kelly, 1st Life Guards, died April 30, 1915.

Lance Corporal Patrick F. Kelly, from Liverpool, of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was killed in action at St. Julien. He is commemorated on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial.

Private Owen Kelly, 6273, age 40, 2nd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Monday May 3, 1915 from wounds received at St. Julien. He is buried in Le Treport Military Cemetery (Plot 2. Row B. Grave 5.), Seine-Marime, France. He was son of Owen and Ellen Kelly, Dublin.

Private P. Kelly, 13172, age 34, York and Lancaster Regiment, died on May 4, 1915.

Private James Kelly, 3330, age 19, 10th Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Tuesday May 4, 1915. He was son of James Davenport Kelly and Annie Francis Kelly, 74 Saxony Rd., Kensington, Liverpool. He is buried in1. D. 8 Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, (Nord), Nord, France. [See Rev. James Davenport Kelly, 1912 (2) and 1950 (4)? Relationship]

Lance Corporal John Sullivan Kelly, 10277, age 21, Leinster Regiment, died on Tuesday May 4, 1915, and is commemorated in the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of Patrick and Anne Kelly, Boughton, Chester, England.

Private M. J. Kelly, 1483, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on May 5, 1915.

Private N. Kelly, 10389, age 38, 1st Bat., Cheshire Regiment, died on Wednesday, May 5, 1915. He was son of John and Rachel Kelly, 11 Stafford St., Dublin. He had served in the South African campaign. He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord), France.

Private Charles Patrick Kelly, CH/10360, age 41, Royal Marine Light Infantry, died on May 5, 1915. Commemorated on Panel 13, Chatam Naval Memorial, London. Husband of Rosa Kelly, of 43, Ashbury Rd., Battersea, London

Private D. Kelly, 11967, age 33, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), died on May 5, 1915.

Private C. Kelly, 3434, age 25, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Thursday, May 6, 1915. He was son of Michael McAnaw Kelly and Mary Jane Kelly, and husband of Madge McAnaw Kelly, Lettermore, Drumkeen, Stranorlar Co. Donegal. He is buried in 11. C. 3, Cluinchy Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Private L. Kelly, 11883, age 24, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), died on Monday May 6, 1915 and is buried in Ypres Town Cemetery Extension, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of Anne Kelly, 77 Silver St., Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, and the late Timothy Kelly.

Lance Corporal Mathew Kelly, 10999, age 21, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Thursday May 6, 1915 and is commemorated on Helles Memorial (Panel 190-196), Turkey. He was son of Patrick and Elizabeth Kelly, Hazelbrook Cottage, Malahide.

Fireman T. Kelly, age 26, Mercantile Marine, died on May 7, 1915.

Trimmer T. E. Kelly, age 20, Mercantile Marine, died on May 7, 1915.

Waiter Alfred Aloysius Kelly, age 20, Mercantile Marine, died May 7, 1915. Commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London. On board the SS “Lusitania” torpedoed off Kinsale, Co. Cork.

Son of John Kelly, of 97, Juvenal St. Dwellings, Liverpool, and the late Elizabeth Kelly. He was born at Seaforth.

Sergeant James Kelly, 6176, age 33, 2nd Bat., East Yorkshire Regiment, brother-in-law of Mrs E. Dobbin, 12 Ferguson’s Lane, English St., Carlisle, died on May 7, 1915, and is commemorated on plate 21 and 31, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West - Vlaanderens, Belgium.

Fireman John Kelly, age 36, Mercantile Marine, died on May 7, 1915. He is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London. He was a seaman on the SS “Lusitania”, sunk by a German submarine off Kinsale, Co. Cork. Son of Margaret and the late John Kelly, of 53, Latham St., Stanley Rd., Kirkdale, Liverpool. Born at Govan, Glasgow.

Yeoman of Signals Fitzgerald Wilkinson Kelly, 204918, age 32, H.M.S. Queen Elizabeth, Royal Navy, died on Friday, May 7, 1915. He was husband of Hilda Phyllis Kelly, 53 Timpson Road, Church Road, Portsmouth. He is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire. Panel 8.

Fifth Engineer Officer S. C. Kelly, age 27, Mercantile Marine, died on May 7, 1915.

Private M. Kelly, 51285, Princess Patrica’s Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment), died on May 8, 1915.

Private John Kelly, 2403, 4th Bat., East Yorkshire Regiment, husband of Florence Alice Bunham (formerly Kelly), 13 Ivy Grove, Pullman St., Springbank West, Hull, died on Saturday, May 8, 1915, and is buried in Hazerbrouck Communal Cemetery, Nord, France. Hazerbrouck is 56 Km., south-east of Calais.

Private Joseph Kelly, 10764, age 44, 2nd Bat., Cheshire Regiment, died on Saturday, May 8, 1915. He was son of the late Patrick and Jessie Kelly. He is commemorated on Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderens, Belgium.

Corporal James Kelly, 8761, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died on May 8, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 47, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, Belgium.

Private John Kelly, 1601, age 34, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Easter Ontario Regiment), died on May 8, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 10, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. Son of John Kelly, of 9, Riversdale St., Belfast, Ireland.

Private John Kelly, 4651, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, died on May 9, 1915. He is commemorated Panel 27 & 28 Le Touret Memorial

Le Touret Memorial is located at the east end of Le Touret Military Cemetery, on the south side of the Bethune-Armentieres main road. From Bethune follow the signs for Armentieres until you are on the D171. Continue on this road through Essars and Le Touret village. Approximately 1 kilometer after Le Touret village and about 5 kilometres before you reach the intersection with the D947, Estaires to La Bassee road, the Cemetery lies on the right hand side of the road.

Rifleman Edward Kelly, 771, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Sunday May 9, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 9, Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. [186 members of the R.I.R., killed on May 15, 1915]

Private G. Kelly, S/2406, Seaforth Highlanders, died on May 9, 1915.

Private Aidan Kelly, from Dublin, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, ‘The Old Toughs’, was killed in action on May 10, 1915 near Wieltje, France, His name is inscribed on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium.

Private J. Kelley, S/5030, 2nd Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Monday May 10, 1915. He is buried in XVII. A. 8 Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Aiden Kelly, 8032, 2nd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Monday May 10, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 44 and 46 on Menin Gate Memorial , Ypres, Leper, Belgium.

Private T. Kelly, 17577, age 17, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Monday May 10, 1915, and is buried in Hooge Crater Cemetery (Grave XVII. A. 16), Leper (Ypres), Belgium. He was son of Robert Millar Kelly, and Elizabeth Kelly, 89 Sunnybank St., Bridgeton, Glasgow.

Private Joseph Fleming Kelly, S/5030, age 23, 2nd Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Monday May 10, 1915. He was husband of Jessie Bradley (formerly Reilly), 10 Silver St., Kincardie, Fife, Scotland. He is commemorated on Panels 24 to 26 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private H. Kelly, 12020, age 30, Middlesex Regiment, died on May 11, 1915.

Lance Sergeant Joseph Kelly, 8697, age 30, ALIAS, died on May 12, 1915. He is commemorated on Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. No Panel given.

See "BROPHY," the true family name

Stoker 1st Class Joseph Kelly, 284755, age 37, H.M.S. Goliath, Royal Navy, died on Thursday, May 13, 1915. He was son of Richard and Jane Kelly, Lanreagh, Cornwall. He is commemorated on Plymouth Naval Memorial, on panel 6.

Stoker 1st Class David Joseph Kelly, SS/107070, (RFD/DEV/B/5713), H.M.S. Goliath, Royal Navy, died on Thursday May 13, 1915. He is commemorated on Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon, Pane 6.

Able Seaman Michael Kelly, 99942, H.M.S. “Goliath”, Royal Navy, died on Thursday, May 13, 1915. He was husband of Catherine Kelly, 39 Chapel St., Aberdeen and was a native of Plymouth. He is commemorated on Plymouth Naval Memorial, Devon, Panel S.

Lance Corporal M. Kelly, 1723, age 65, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on May 15, 1915.

Private Michael Kelly, 4218, age 20, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Sunday, May 16, 1915. He was son of Pat and Susan Kelly, Derryherk, Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal. He is commemorated on Panel 16 and 17 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Hugh Kelly, 4685, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Sunday, May 16, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 16 and 17, Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais.

Private James Kelly, 9389, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Sunday, May 16, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 16 and 17 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private Michael Kelly, 10160, 1st Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Sunday May 16, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 6 to 8 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Sergeant Peter Kelly, 1408, 2nd Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Monday May 17, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 24 to 28 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private James Kelly, 128, 1st Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Monday May 17, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 27 and 38 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Lance Corporal James Kelly, 5346, age 22, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Tuesday May 18, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 4, Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of Thomas and Catherine Agnes Kelly, Cloonfad, Frenchpark, Co. Roscommon.

Private M. J. Kelly, 1657, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on May 18, 1915.

Sergeant E. Kelly, 7398, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, died on May 18, 1915.

Private J. F. Kelly, 10781, age 22, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died on May 18, 1915.

Captain Henry Arundel de Pentheny O’Kelly, age 45, 18th (Queen Mary’s Own) Hussars, died on Tuesday May 18, 1915. He was son of Lt. Col. De Pentheny O’Kelly, La Retraite, Weston-Super-Mare. He served in the South African Campaign. He is buried in 1. D. 5 Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. [See Peter de Pentheny O’Kelly, Barretstown House, Co. Kildare in Annals of O’Kellys 1858 (2)]

Burgher J. Kelly, 63, Mounted Commandos South African Forces, died on May 20, 1915. He is buried in Usakos Cemetery, Namibia. The cemetery, which is owned by the municipality, is situated on the outskirts of town. Follow the main road in the direction of Karibib, turn right at the abattoir, and the cemetery is 0.5 km further on.

The eight war graves were brought in after the armistice. No. of Identified Casualties: 11

Private R. O. Kelly, 9258, age 33, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died on May 22, 1915.

Private J. Kelly, 3636, age 20, Leinster Regiment, son of John and Mary Kelly, 4 Chapel Lane, Athy, Co. Kildare died on Sunday May 23, 1915, and is buried in Netley Military Cemetery, Hampshire, England.

Gunner A. Kelly, 339, Royal Garrison Artillery, died on May 24, 1915.

Private Thomas Kelly, 5943, 2nd Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on May 24, 1915. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium.

Private P. Kelly, 5702, 3rd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Tuesday May 25, 1915 and is buried in Bailleul Community Cemetery Extension (Nord) (Grave 1. F. 106), Nord France.

Private Patrick Kelly, of Dublin, a member of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on May 25, 1915, of wounds and gas poising received at Mouse Trap Farm, Belgium, and is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery.

Lance Corporal E. Kelly, 12504, Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on May 25, 1915

Private John Kelly, 10311, age 21, 1st Bat., Connaught Rangers, died of wounds on Tuesday, May 25, 1915, and is buried in Cabaret-Rouge Cemetery, Souchez, (3.5 Km north of Arras, on the main road to Bethune), Pas de Calais, France. He enlisted in Galway. John was born in Cummer, Tuam, Co. Galway.

Assistant Steward J. Kelly, 764661, age 26, Mercantile Marine Reserve, died on May 27, 1915.

Lance Corporal E. Kelly, 12504, 9th Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Friday May 28, 1915. He is buried in A. 119, Dundonald (Shewalton) Cemetery, Ayrshire, Scotland.

Private P. J. Kelly, 2339, Coldstream Guards, died on May 28, 1915.

Drummer Henry Stewart Ullyett Kelly, 1674, age 20, 1st/7th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Saturday May 29, 1915 and is buried in Redoubt Cemetery, Helles, Turkey. He was son of William Henry and Mary Kelly (nee Stewart), 8 Mackworth St., Bangor Street, Stretford Road, Hulme, Manchester.

Private Patrick Kelly, 12654, 1st Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Saturday, May 29, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 97 to 101, Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Lance Corporal Charles Oswald Kelly, 868, 4th Bat., Australian Infantry A.I.F., son of Joseph and Emma Kelly, 5 Leichhardt St., Glebe, N.S.W., died on May 31, 1915, and is commemorated in Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Some background

An eight month campaign was fought in Gallipoli, Turkey, by the British Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock on the Western Front in France and Belgium and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on April 25-26, 1915, the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north at GABA Tepe on the west coast.

On April 28, 1915 following the landings at Helles, the first attack was mounted towards Achi Baba, the ridge that dominated the southern part of the peninsula. Fatigue soon brought the assault to a halt some kilometres short of the objective, near the village of Krithia. Turkish counter attacks followed but were repulsed and during the period 6th to the 8th of May, the 29th Division and French Divisions, reinforced by the Australian and New Zealand Brigades, carried out renewed attacks on Krithia making some gains but suffering heavy casualties. Between May 1 and the beginning of June, the 29th Indian Infantry Brigade and the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division landed on the peninsula. With these reinforcements, the Allied Forces at Helles pushed forward once more on June 4, but once more with little effect. A further attack on June 28 and July 5 at Gully Ravine inflicted heavy casualties on the Turks, but despite local gains there was no breakthrough. By July 13, the advance at Helles was effectively over and the position remained unchanged until the evacuation in January 1916. There are 2,027 servicemen buried or commemorated in Redoubt Cemetery so called because of a chain of Forts built by the Turks across the southern end of the peninsula. 1393 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate 349 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. As can be seen later many Kellys were among the dead.

A large number of British, Australian, New Zealand soldiers took part in the war this year in Gallipoli. The “British” contingent included many Irish who were not British but at that time belonged to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland took part in this bloody campaign. Included in the Australian, New Zealand and “British” were many Kellys. As will be seen below many Kellys fought and many died, in what was one of the bloodiest chapters in the war, the invasion of attempt in Gallipoli, to force the Turks out of the war. The campaign was to prove a failure. [ In a letter to the Irish Times commenting on an article by Kevin Myers, Gerard Morgan FTCD, wrote Kevin Myers tribute to Alex Maskey (1st Sinn Fein Mayor of Belfast) in commemorating the Irish dead of the Somme (including no doubt the Tyneside Irish Brigade wiped out in advance on Contalmaison) is fitting and well-timed (An Irishman’s Diary, July 16th). But the time is surely also at hand for the British Government (and perhaps also the Australian and New Zealand governments) to display a similar generosity by acknowledging in some suitable fashion the heroism of the Irish dead at Gallipoli.

The assault on Gallipoli was spearheaded by 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers and the 1st Royal Munster Fusiliers of the 29th Division, and they were annihilated at Cape Helles on V Beach, on the collier the River Clyde and in the village and castle of Sedd-el-Bahr on April 25th and 26th 1915. The Times History of the War (London 1915) records that “the glorious annals of British Army present no example of a position carried against more dreadful odds”.

Even more disastrous from Irelands point of view was the destruction of the 10th (Irish) Division of Kitchener’s First New Army at Suvla Bay in August and September 1915.

With the tragic and monumental sacrifice of Irish youth men (mostly well educated) the cause of Irish Home Rule and peace in Ireland was doomed.”]

Private Stephen Kelly, 1476, age 20, 1st/8th Bat., Lancashire Regiment, died on Thursday June 3, 1915. He was son of Charles and Margaret Ann Kelly, 60 Greengate, Salford, Manchester. He is commemorated on Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private James Kelly, 1663, 1st/10th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Friday June 4, 1915 and is commemorated on Helles Memorial, Turkey. The obelisk stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula.

Able Seaman P. J. Kelly, Mersey Z/235, age 18, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, died on June 4, 1915.

Private Eugene Daniel Kelly, 2389, age 20, 1st/5th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Friday June 4, 1915 and is buried in Redoubt Cemetery, Helles, Turkey. He was son of Daniel and Jane Kelly, 6 Springfield St., Wigan, Lancashire. [See 1915 (16) above].

Private John Kelly, 2026, age 20, 1st/7th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Friday June 4, 1915 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Turkey. The obelisk is situated on the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula. He was son of Mrs Annie Kelly, 33 Clifford St., Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester.

Private Thomas Kelly, 2065, age 27, 1st/5th Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Friday June 4, 1915. He was son of the late Thomas and Rachel Kelly and husband of Florence Hulton (formerly Kelly) Claremont Lodge, Tottington, Bury. He is commemorated on Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private Thomas Kelly, 1194, age 21, “D” Coy. 1st/5th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Saturday June 5, 1915 and is commemorated on Helles Memorial, Turkey (Panel 158-170). The memorial is at the tip of the Gallipolli Peninsula and takes the form of an obelisk over 30 meters high and can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles. He was son of Edward and Jane Kelly, 35 Kay’s House, Wigan, Lancashire.

Private H. Kelly, 5627, 2nd Bn., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Sunday June 6, 1915, buried in Roeselare Communal Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (20 Km. North east of Leper town centre).

Private J. Kelly, 2203, 8th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Sunday June 6, 1915 and is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Turkey (1 Kmwest of Sedd el Bahr village. It stands on a small ridge named Karaja Oghul Tepe, 110 meters above the sea and overlooking “W” Beach).

Private John Kelly, L/14853, Royal Fusiliers, died on June 6, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 37 to 41 or 328 Helles Memorial. The Helles Memorial stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. It takes the form of an obelisk over 30 meters high that can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles.

The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915 the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. However, the difficult terrain and stiff Turkish resistance soon led to the stalemate of trench warfare. From the end of August, no further serious action was fought and the lines remained unchanged. The peninsula was successfully evacuated in December and early January 1916. The Helles Memorial serves the dual function of Commonwealth battle memorial for the whole Gallipoli campaign and place of commemoration for many of those Commonwealth servicemen who died there and have no known grave. The United Kingdom and Indian forces named on the memorial died in operations throughout the peninsula, the Australians at Helles. There are also panels for those who died or were buried at sea in Gallipoli waters. The memorial bears more than 21,000 names. There are four other Memorials to the Missing at Gallipoli. The Lone Pine, Hill 60, and Chunuk Bair Memorials commemorate Australian and New Zealanders at Anzac. The Twelve Tree Copse Memorial commemorates the New Zealanders at Helles. Naval casualties of the United Kingdom lost or buried at sea are recorded on their respective Memorials at Portsmouth, Plymouth and Chatham, in the United Kingdom. No. of Identified Casualties: 20835

Private J. Kelly, 9515, 2nd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Sunday June 6, 1915 and is buried in Roeselare Communal Cemetery (Grave 111. C. 3), Roeselare, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private Henry Kelly, from Kilkenny, a member of ‘The Old Toughs’ lost his life on June 6th, from his wounds, and rests in Roulers Communal Cemetery.

On the same day Private John Kelly from Dublin who was also a member of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers died of his wounds, which he had received at Mouse Trap Farm, Belgium and is buried in the same cemetery.

Private John Kelly, 11830, South Wales Borderers, died on June 7, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 14 & 15 Le Touret Memorial

The Memorial takes the form of a loggia surrounding an open rectangular court. The court is enclosed by three solid walls and on the eastern side by a colonnade. East of the colonnade is a wall and the colonnade and wall are prolonged northwards (to the road) and southwards, forming a long gallery. Small pavilions mark the ends of the gallery and the western corners of the court. The names of those commemorated are listed on panels set into the walls of the court and the gallery, arranged by Regiment, Rank and alphabetically by surname within the rank. Over 13,000 names are listed on the memorial of men who fell in this area before 25 September 1915 and who have no known grave.

The Memorial in Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-l'Avoue, is one of those erected by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to record the names of the officers and men who fell in the Great War and whose graves are not known. It serves the area enclosed on the North by the river Lys and a line drawn from Estaires to Fournes, and on the South by the old Southern boundary of the First Army about Grenay and it covers the period from the arrival of the II Corps in Flanders in 1914 to the eve of the Battle of Loos. It does not include the names of officers and men of Canadian or Indian regiments they are found on the Memorials at Vimy and Neuve-Chapelle. No. of Identified Casualties: 13369

Private J. Kelly, 7404, 5th Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Thursday June 10, 1915. He is buried in XII. B. 10 Redoubt Cemetery, Helles, Turkey.

Private P. Kelly, 8354, North Staffordshire Regiment, died on June 11, 1915.

Rifleman P. Kelly, 23453, 2nd/5th Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Saturday June 12, 1915. He is buried in H. 87 Douglas Cemetery, Isle of Man.

Private Stephen Kelly, 4933, 2nd Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Tuesday June 15, 1915. He was husband of Nellie Kelly, 29 Smith St., Higher Openshaw, Manchester. He is commemorated on Panel 33 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West - Vlanderen, Belgium.

Private C. H. Kelly, 580, Royal Canadian Dragoons, died on June 18, 1915. Buried in grave II. C. 42, Lillers Communal Cemetery.

Private P. Kelly, 114520, age 28, Welsh Regiment, died on June 20, 1915.

Private Philip Kelly, 1185, 1st Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Monday June 21, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 24 to 26 Le Toouret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Bandsman P. Kelly of the Royal Irish Rifles was Mentioned in Despatches on June 22, 1915. [The 1st Royal Irish Rifles in the Great War, by James Taylor (2002)]

Private P. Kelly, 6302, age 22, 1st Bat., Royal Munster Fusiliers, died on Friday June 25, 1915 and is buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery (Grave VII. A. 6), Turkey. He was son of John and Mary Kelly, Tullamore, Listowel, Co. Kerry. [Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery is in the Helles area, about 11 Km south-west of the village of Krithia]

Private William Kelly, 17165, age 18, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Tuesday June 29, 1915 and is commemorated on Helles Memorial (Panel 190 to 196), Turkey. He was son of Florence Susan and Peter Kelly, Kilburn, London.

Private D. Kelly, 1864, 4th Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Tuesday June 29, 1915. He is buried in XVII. D. 25 Caberet-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Pas de Calais, France.

Private T. Kelly, 16872, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Tuesday June 29, 1915 and is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Turkey. It stands on a small ridge Karaja Oghul Tepe, 110 meters above the sea and overlooking “W” Beach.

Private E. Kelly, 9702, age 31, 2nd Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Sunday July 4, 1915. He was husband of Mary Kelly, 48 Orchard St., Oatlands, Glasgow. He is buried in 1. G. 9 St. Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richenbourg-L’Avoue, Pas de Calais, France.

Private J. Kelly, 2643, 7th Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Sunday July, 4, 1915. He was brother of Miss. M. A. Kelly, 143 Albert Rd., Dalston, London. He is buried in 111. M. 2 Merville Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.

Private W. Kelly, 7884, 2nd Bat., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on Sunday, July 4, 1915. He is buried in 111. L. 5, Niederzwehren Cemetery, Kassel, Hessen, Germany.

Private P. J. Kelly, 1679, age 20, 3rd Lowland Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, died on Monday July 5, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel E. 177 on Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Private Alfred Kelly, 1647, Australian Infantry A.I.F., died July 6, 1915, and is buried in Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.

Sapper B. Kelly, 82636, age 37, 173rd Tunneling Coy., Royal Engineers, died on Tuesday July 6, 1915 and is buried in Sp. Mem. 13., Rue-de Bois Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix, Pas de Calais, France. He was husband of Mary Kelly, 22 Chantrell St., York Road, Leeds, England.

Private J. Kelly, 11506, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on Tuesday July 6, 1915 and is buried in Artillery Wood Cemetery (Grave 111. D. 9), Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Deckhand E. Kelly, age 54, Mercantile Marine, died July 7, 1915.

Second Lieutenant E. R. Kelly, age 17, Border Regiment, died on July 7, 1915.

Private J. Kelly, 6784, 1st Bat., East Yorkshire Regiment, died on Thursday, July 8, 1915, and is buried in La Brique Military Cemetery, No. 1, Leper, West- Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private J. F. Kelly, 9887, age 19, Hampshire Regiment, died on July 9, 1915.

Private Edward Kelly, 1922, age 19, 1st/9th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Monday July 12, 1915 and is buried in Redoubt Cemetery (Grave X11, Helles, Turkey. He was son of John and Louisa Kelly, 7 Water St., Dento, Manchester.

Private R. Kelly, 2429, Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, died on July 12, 1915.

Lance Corporal Thomas Kelly, 2289, age 27, 7th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Monday July 12, 1915.

He was son of Thomas and Mary Alice Hayes Kelly, Caledonian Brick Works, Polmadie Road, Glasgow. He was born in Northampton. He is commemorated on Panel 173 to 177 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private Timothy Francis Kelly, Australian Infantry, Base Depot, died on July 14, 1915, and is buried in Rookwood Necropolis, Sydney, Australia.

Private P. Kelly, 10812, ALIAS, died on July 14, 1915.

Corporal Fred Kelley, 2012, age 33, 1st/5th Bat., West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own), died on Thursday July 15, 1915. He was son of John Thomas and Isabel Kelley, Ottley, Yorks. and husband of Annie Kelley, Harrowgate. He is buried in VIII. B. 61 Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Private J. Kelly, 8576, East Lancashire Regiment, died on July 17, 1915. He is buried in grave II B. 22A Estaples Military Cemetery. Etaples is a town about 27 kilometres south of Boulogne. The Military Cemetery is to the north of the town, on the west side of the road to Boulogne.

During the First World War, the area around Etaples was the scene of immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from attack, except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern and the southern battlefields. In 1917, 100,000 troops were camped among the sand dunes and the hospitals, which included eleven general, one stationary, four Red Cross hospitals and a convalescent depot, could deal with 22,000 wounded or sick. In September 1919, ten months after the Armistice, three hospitals and the Q.M.A.A.C. convalescent depot remained. The cemetery contains 10,773 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the earliest dating from May 1915. 35 of these burials are unidentified. Hospitals were again stationed at Etaples during the Second World War and the cemetery was used for burials from January 1940 until the evacuation at the end of May 1940. After the war, a number of graves were brought into the cemetery from other French burial grounds. Of the 119 Second World War burials, 38 are unidentified. Etaples Military Cemetery also contains 658 German burials and a few war graves of other nationalities. The cemetery, the largest Commission cemetery in France, was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. No. of Identified Casualties: 11479

August 1915

Private Owen Kelly, 9176, “B” Coy. 2nd Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Sunday August 1,1915 and is buried in grave VI. E. 27 A. Etables Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of Owen and Bessie Kelly, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath.

Gunner P. Kelly, 17692, Royal Garrison Artillery, died on August 4, 1915.

Private E. Kelly, 17229, Hampshire Regiment, died on August 6, 1915.

Corporal R. Kelly, 8/1390, Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F., died on August 6, 1915.

Private Frederick Kelly, 749, age 21, 3rd Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., son of Thomas Joseph and Mary Jane Kelly, Kildarun, Singleton, N.S.W., and a native of Coonamble, N.S.W., died on August 7, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private J. Kelly, 7767, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, attd. 32nd Signal Corps, Royal Engineers, died on Saturday August 7, 1915 and is buried in Grave V. B. 12, Basra War Cemetery, Iraq.

Private P. Kelly, 1382, age 25, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on August 7, 1915.

Private Thomas James Kelly, 2233, age 28, 16th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., son of Ann Kelly, 96 Maran St., Boulder City, Western Australia, a native of Freemantle, Western Australia, died on August 7, 1915.

Private Herbert Kelly, 158, age 22, 15th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., son of Francis Charles and Johanna I. L. Kelly, “Melrose”, Standring, St., Toowong, Brisbane, a native of Brixton, London, England, died on August 8, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private H. Kelly, 10601, South Staffordshire Regiment, died on August 8, 1915.

Trimmer G. E. Kelly, age 20, Mercantile Marine Reserve, died on August 8, 1915

Private P. Kelly, 1968, age 36, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on August 8, 1915.

Private Patrick Joseph Kelly, 612, 15th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., joined 18/9/14, killed in action on August 8, 1915.

Fireman T. Kelly, Mercantile Marine Reserve, died on August 8, 1915.

Corporal David Kellie, 13500, age 34, 6th Bat., East Yorkshire Regiment, died on Monday August 9, 1915. He was son of John and Elizabeth Kellie, and husband of Mary Ann Charleton Kellie, 6 Bloomfield Terrace, Pelton Fell, Co. Durham. He is commemorated on Panel 51 to 54 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private C. Kelly, 11104, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own), died on August 9, 1915. Commemorated on Panel 47 to 51 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Sapper J. H. Kelly, 47206, 90th Field Coy., Royal Engineers, died on Sunday August 8, 1915 and is buried in grave 11. A. 26, Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’Avoue, Pas de Calais, France.

Private T. F. Kelly, 3/10019, Durham Light Infantry, died on August 9, 1915.

Private M. Kelly, 12789, age 21, South Wales Borderers, died in August 9, 1915.

Company Sergeant Major Alexander Kelly, 199, age 40, 1st/8th Bat., Manchester Regiment, died on Tuesday August 10, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 158 to 170 on Helles Memorial, Turkey. He was son of the late John and Mary Kelly and husband of Jane Kelly, 25 Ambush St., Higher Openshaw, Manchester.

Rifleman John Kelly, 10489, 6th Bat., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Tuesday, August 10, 1915, and is commemorated on Helles Memorial, on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey. The memorial takes the form of an obelisk, over 30 meters high and can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles. The 8 months campaign was fought by the Commonwealth and French in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war.

Private J. Kelly, 12906, South Wales Borders, died on August 10, 1915. He is buried in Sp. Men. 41 Embankment Pier Cemetery. The Anzac and Suvla cemeteries are first signposted from the left hand junction of the Eceabat- Bigali Road. From this junction travel into the main Anzac area. After 12.8kms the cemetery will be found on the left. Embarkation Pier is on the north side of the mouth of Chailak Dere, at the north end of Ocean Beach (or North Beach). The cemetery is a little way inland, between the beach and the road from Anzac to Suvla. No. of Identified Casualties: 282

Private T. Kelly, 6/1894, age 42, Canterbury Regiment, N.Z.E.F., died on August 10, 1915.

Lance Corporal T. Kelly, 21573, age 26, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died on August 15. 1915.

Private William Kelly, DCM, 1577, 4th Bat., Australian Infantry, died on August 11, 1915 and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private J. J. Kelly, 17879, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, died on August 13, 1915.

Lance Sergeant Richard Kelly, 503, age 21, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Friday August 13, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 181 to 183 on Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Sapper W. Kelly, 6901, No 1 Siege Coy., Royal Anglesey, Royal Engineers, died on Friday August 13, 1915 and is buried in grave 11. D. 67, East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, Greece.

Private John Thomas Henry Kelly, 1391, 13th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on August 15, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private Austin Kelly, 13826, age 18, “C” Coy. 7th Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Monday August 16, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 190-196 on Helles Memorial, Turkey. He was born on November 12, 1896 to John and Annie Kelly, Clonmellon, Co. Westmeath. He was uncle of Oisin Kelly who was to become a famous sculptor.

Sergeant D. Kelly, 7655, 2nd Bat., Leinster Regiment, died on Monday August 16, 1915 and is buried in grave 1. G. 11, Poperinghe New Military Cemetery, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Sergeant F. Kelly, 13380, South Staffordshire Regiment, died August 19, 1915.

Leading Seaman F. A. Kelly, Wales Z/4, age 26, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, died on December 18, 1915.

Private Alexander Campbell Kelly, S/3230, age 19, Seaforth Highlanders, died August 20, 1915. Buried in grave IV. A. 17 Lillers Communal Cemetery.

Son of Robert and Agnes Campbell Kelly, of "Brooklinn," 3, Greenock Avenue, Old Cathcart, Glasgow. Native of Renfrew

Lillers is a small town about 15 kilometres west-north-west of Bethune and the Communal Cemetery and Extension lie to the north of the town. From the Marie in the centre of the town, head north on the D182, after 500 meters turn right onto Rue St Venant. The cemetery is a further 200 meters on the left hand side. Within the Communal Cemetery the Commonwealth war graves are situated on the right hand side half way up the cemetery central path, and the Extension is at the far right end of the Communal Cemetery. Both cemeteries are signposted.

Lillers was used for billets and headquarter offices from the autumn of 1914 to April 1918. At that time it was a hospital centre with the 6th, 9th, 18th, 32nd, 49th and 58th Casualty Clearing Stations in the town at one time or another. These units buried their dead on the right of the central path of the communal cemetery, working back from Plot I. In April 1918, the Germans advanced as far as Robecq Lillers came under shell-fire, and the units holding this front continued to bury beyond the cemetery boundary, in the extension. The COMMUNAL CEMETERY contains 894 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 67 of which are unidentified. There are also 15 German graves in the Commonwealth plots. The EXTENSION contains 71 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, six of them unidentified. No. of Identified Casualties: 841

Private E. Kelly, 9692, age 24, Border Regiment, died on August 21.

Private J. Kelly, 5708, age 25, 1st Bat., Royal Munster Fusiliers, died on Saturday August 21, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 185 to 190 on Helles Memorial, Turkey. He was son of Mrs Honoria Kelly, Jamestown, Piltown, Co. Kilkenny, and the late Constable J. Kelly of the Royal Irish Constabulary.

Corporal Thomas Kelly, 3694, age 19, 1st Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Saturday August 21, 1915. He was son of Elizabeth Kelly, 3 Livingston St., Bolton and the late Thomas Kelly. He is commemorated on Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Sergeant M. Kelly, 11058, age 32, Yorkshire Regiment, died on August 22, 1915.

Private E. Kelly, 18166, 2nd Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Tuesday August 24, 1915. He is buried in 1. B. 8, Auchonvillers Military Cemetery, Somme, France.

Engineman E. Kelly, 170ES, age 32, Royal Naval Reserve, died on August 26, 1915.

Private J. P. Kelly, 1959, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on August 26, 1915. Buried in grave II. H. 11., Haidar Pasha Cemetery. Haidar Pasha is a suburb of Istanbul between Scutari (Uskudar) and Kadikoy on the Asiatic side of the Bosphorus. The cemetery is on high ground behind the Haida Pasha pier head and railway station. By ferry from the Golden Horn, Istanbul: Take the ferry from Karakoy, near the Galata Bridge, to Haidar Pasha pier head and railway station. Go around to the right (south) side of the main station building and follow the road east approximately 400 metres. Close to the mosque with twin minarets there are steps up to the Kadikoy Rimtimi Cad Road. Turn left (northwards) along this road (passing over the railway lines) and continues for approximately 700 metres and then at the traffic lights turn left down towards the entrance to the cemetery - just past the military hospital main gate.

HAIDAR PASHA CEMETERY was first established for Crimean war burials and was used during the First World War by the Turks for the burial of Commonwealth prisoners of war. After the Armistice, when Istanbul was occupied, further burials were made mainly from No 82 General Hospital and graves were brought in from other civil cemeteries in the area. During the Second World War, Turkey retained her neutrality and those Commonwealth servicemen buried there were mainly men taken prisoner during operations in the Aegean, who died while attempting to escape from camps where they awaited transport to Germany and Italy, and whose bodies were washed up on the Turkish coast. The war graves plot contains 405 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 60 of them unidentified. Second World War burials number 39, 14 of them unidentified. Also within the cemetery, which the Commission maintains as a whole, are about 6,000 Crimean graves, mostly unmarked, and numerous non war military and civilian graves and memorials. Within the war graves plot stands the HAIDAR PASHA CREMATION MEMORIAL, which commemorates 122 soldiers of the Indian Army who died in 1919 and 1920 who were originally commemorated at Mashiak and Osmanieh Cemeteries. In 1961 when these cemeteries could no longer be maintained, the ashes of the Hindus, whose remains were cremated in accordance with their faith, were scattered near this memorial, while the remains of their comrades of the Muslim faith were brought here and re-interred. The war graves plot also contains the HAIDAR PASHA MEMORIAL, which was erected to commemorate more than 30 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War who died fighting in South Russia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, and in post Armistice operations in Russia and Transcaucasia, whose graves are not known. An Addenda panel was later added to commemorate over 170 Commonwealth casualties who are buried in cemeteries in South Russia and Transcaucasia whose graves can no longer be maintained. No. of Identified Casualties: 451

Private James Kelly, 333, 14th Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., died on August 27, 1915, and is commemorated on Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private T. Kelly, 5747, 1st Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Friday August 27, 1915 and is buried in Hill 10 Cemetery, Turkey. Hill 10 is a low isolated mound on the north side of the Salt Lake, close to the sea shore, inland from Suvla Bay.

Private Edward Kelly, 350, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Saturday August 28, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 181 to 183, Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Sergeant Thomas Kelly, 7047, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Saturday, August 28, 1915, and is commemorated on panel 181-183, Helles Memorial (on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey.

September 1915

Private Patrick Kelly, of Blackrock, Co. Dublin, and formerly from Naas, Co. Kildare, a member of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died of wounds, in a German Prisoner of War Camp, on September 4, 1915.

Private P. Kelly, 8269, 2nd Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Saturday September 4, 1915 and is buried in Niederzwehren Cemetery (Grave 111. J. 16), Kassel, Hessen, Germany.

Trooper Charles Kelly, 130, 8th Australian Light Horse, joined the service on September 10, 1914 died of wounds on August 8, 1915, and is commemorated in Lone Pine Memorial, Turkey.

Private A. Kelly, 2767, 9th (Glasgow Hds.) Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Sunday September 12, 1915.

He is buried in 1. D. 2, Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, Pas de Calais, France.

Corporal James Kelly, 13822, age 18, 7th Bat., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on Monday September 20, 1915 and is commemorated on Special Memorial D. 5., in Green Hill Cemetery, Turkey. He was son of James and Edith Kelly, Tower Avenue, Rathgar, Dublin. The cemetery about 52 meters above sea level rises almost from the eastern shore of Salt Lake. The cemetery lies on the east side of the Anzac-Suvla Road and can be seen from Anzac and Suvla.

Private John Kelly, 8048, 1st/4th Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Monday September 20, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 72 to 75 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private Bernard Kelly, 8238, age 33, 10th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He was nephew of Mrs. Mary Kelly, 51 Leper St., Belfast. He had previously served in the South African Campaign. He had eight years service in the Royal Inniskiling Fusiliers. He is commemorated on Panel 108 to 112 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais.

Corporal Daniel Kelly, 12861, 10th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 108 to 112 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Sergeant D. Kelly, S/1745, Gordon Highlanders, died on September 25, 1915.

Corporal D. Kelly, 12861, Highland Light Infantry, died on September 25, 1915.

Private James Kelly, 12951, Royal Scots, died September 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 10 to 13 Loos Memorial. The Loos Memorial forms the side and back of Dud Corner Cemetery, and commemorates over 20,000 officers and men who have no known grave, who fell in the area from the River Lys to the old southern boundary of the First Army, east and west of Grenay. Loos-en-Gohelle is a village 5 kilometres north-west of Lens, and Dud Corner Cemetery is located about 1 kilometre west of the village, to the north-east of the N43 the main Lens to Bethune road.

Dud Corner Cemetery stands almost on the site of a German strong point, the Lens Road Redoubt, captured by the 15th (Scottish) Division on the first day of the battle. The name "Dud Corner" is believed to be due to the large number of unexploded enemy shells found in the neighbourhood after the Armistice. On either side of the cemetery is a wall 15 feet high, to which are fixed tablets on which are carved the names of those commemorated. At the back are four small circular courts, open to the sky, in which the lines of tablets are continued, and between these courts are three semicircular walls or apses, two of which carry tablets, while on the centre apse is erected the Cross of Sacrifice. No. of Identified Casualties: 20581

Rifleman James Kelly, 8478, age 27, 1st Bat., Royal Irish Rifles, died on Saturday, September 25, 1915, was the son of James Kelly, and is commemorated on panel 9, Ploegsteert Memorial, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium.. [16 R.I.R men killed on September 25, 1915]

Lance Sergeant John Kelly, 9132, age 21, South Staffordshire Regiment, died on September 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 73 to 76 Loos Memorial.

Son of the late Michael and Mary Kelly. No address given.

Private J. Kelly, 4619, 2nd Battalion, Leinster Regiment, died on Saturday, September 25, 1915, and is buried in grave Bl. 1, Potijze Burial Ground Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private John Kelly, 8048, Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on September 25, 1915. Panel 72 to 75 Helles Memorial. The Helles Memorial stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. It takes the form of an obelisk over 30 metres high that can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles.

Gunner J. Kelly, 13141, Royal Garrison Artillery, 61 st Trench Mortar Bty., died on September 25, 1915. Buried in grave IV. E. 3. Merville Communal Cemetery.

Merville is a town 15 kilometres north of Bethune and about 20 kilometres south-west of Armentieres. The Communal Cemetery is on the north-east side of the town to the north of the D38 road to Neuf-Berquin

Merville was the scene of fighting between the Germans and French and British cavalry early in October 1914 but from the 9th of that month to 11 April 1918, it remained in Allied hands. In October 1914, and in the autumn of 1915, the town was the headquarters of the Indian Corps. It was a railhead until May 1915, and a billeting and hospital centre from 1915-1918. The 6th and Lahore Casualty Clearing Stations were there from the autumn of 1914 to the autumn of 1915 the 7th from December 1914, to April 1917 the 54th (1st/2nd London) from August 1915 to March 1918, and the 51st (Highland) from May 1917 to April 1918. On the evening of 11 April 1918, in the Battles of the Lys, the Germans forced their way into Merville and the town was not retaken until 19 August. The cemeteries were not used again until the concentration of battlefield burials into the Extension began, after the Armistice. During the Second World War the river Lys was the southern end of a deep but narrow area held by British forces at the end of May 1940. Merville is on the territory over which were fought desperate rearguard actions during the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Force to the coast, for evacuation from Dunkirk. MERVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY was used by French troops (chiefly cavalry) in October 1914, and for Commonwealth burials from that date until August 1916 (in the case of officers, to March 1918). It now contains 1,268 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, and 12 French war graves. There is also 1 non war burial. MERVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION was opened in August 1916, and used by Commonwealth and Portuguese hospitals until April 1918. It was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediately north and east of Merville and from Caudescure Halte Cemetery, Morbecque. The Extension now contains 920 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 345 of them unidentified. The 92 Second World War burials (18 of them unidentified) occurred mostly during the fighting in May 1940 and are interspersed among the First World War graves. The Extension also contains 19 war graves of other nationalities. The Extension was designed by Sir Herbert Baker. No. of Identified Casualties: 1283

Gunner John Kelly, 66339, 105 Bty., Royal Field Artillery, died on Saturday September 25, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 3, Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France..

Private John Kelly, S/4062, 9th Bat., BlackWatch (Royal Highlanders), died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 78 to 83 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private John Kelly, S/7334, age 24, 9th Bat., Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He was son of Charles M. Kelly and Helen Kelly, 68 Mungo St., Glasgow. He is commemorated on Panel 78 to 83 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private John Kelly, 17668, age 21, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, died on September 25, 1915. Commemorated Panel 89 to 91 Loos Memorial. Son of Thomas and Mary Alice Kelly, of 88, Mason St., Bolton.

Private J. Kelly, 4281, age 17, 12th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He was son of Stephen and Margaret Kelly, 4 Graham St., Bridgeton, Glasgow. He is commemorated on Panel 108 to 112 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private James Kelly, 13447, Cameron’s (Scottish Rifles), died on September 25, 1915. Commemorated Panel 57 to 59 Loos Memorial.

Private James Kelly, 2038, 1st/7th Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 27 to 30 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Rifleman P. Kelly, A/2255, age 36, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, died on September 25, 1915.

Lance Corporal S. Kelly, 10181, age 19, Devonshire Regiment, died on September 25, 1915.

Private T. Kelly, 17390, age 22, Leicestershire Regiment, died on September 25, 1915

Private Anthony Kelly, 12321, age 20, 2nd Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Saturday September 25, 1915. He was son of Anthony and Mary Ann Kelly, 22 Argyle St., Motherwell, Lanarkshire. He is commemorated on Panel 108 to 112 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Major H. N. Kelly, age 45, 33rd Punjabis, died on September 25, 1915.

Private Thomas Kelly, 17012, age 27, 8th Bat., East Yorkshire Regiment, died on Sunday September 26, 1915. He was son of Thomas and Elizabeth Kelly, 107 Beaumont Terrace., Westerhope and husband of Mabel Ann Kelly, 2 Beaumont Terrace. Dinnington Colliery, Newcastle-on-Tyne. He is commemorated on Panel 40 and 41 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private T. Kelly, 17771, 12th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Sunday September 26, 1915. He is buried in 111. C. 3 Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos, Pas de Calais, France.

Private T. Kelly, 12993, age 29, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, died on September 26, 1915.

Private A. Kelly, 14959, Royal Scots, died September 26, 1915.

Private John Kelly, S/6400, age 17, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, died on September 27, 1915. Commemorated on Panel 125 to 127 Loos Memorial.

Private Malachy Kelly, 7628, 1st Bat., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on Monday September 27, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 27 to 30 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Able Seaman D. J. Kelly, Bristol Z/291, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, died on December 27, 1915.

Private Thomas Kelly, 4084, age 22, 2nd Bat., Irish Guards, killed in action on Tuesday September 28, 1915 and is commemorated on Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of Mrs Elizabeth Kelly, Woodlands, Castledermot, Co. Kildare.

Private George James Kelly, 38, age 35, 21st Bat., Australian Infantry, A.I.F., son of George and Kate Newman Kelly, and husband of M. F. Kelly, 25 Toward St., Murrumbeena, Victoria. George was born in Melbourne and died on September 30, 1915, and is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Private Joseph Kelly, 13388, age 28, C. Coy., 7th Bat., Royal Scots Fusiliers, died on Thursday September 30, 1915. He was son of John and Maryann Kelly, Springburn. He is buried in Plot 1. Roe K. Grave 8 A. Le Treport Military Cemetery, Seine-Maritime, France.

Private William Kelly, 7405, age 21, 2nd Bat., Irish Guards, killed in action on Thursday September 30, 1915 and is commemorated on panel 9 and 10 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of Thomas and Bridget Kelly, Lisdockey, Drumsna, Co. Leitrim. 37


October 1915

Private J. Kelly, 10167, age 20, 1st Bat., Connaught Rangers, son of John and Mary Kelly, Mary’s Lane, Monasterevin, Co. Kildare, died on Saturday, October 2, 1915, and is buried in St. Vaas Post Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’Avoue, ( 9 Km north-east of Bethune), Pas de Calais, France.

Corporal P. J. Kelly, 6/1200, Canterbury Regiment, N.Z.E.F., died on October 2, 1915.

Private Mark Kelly, 12139, age 39, 2nd Bat., Cheshire Regiment, died on Sunday, October 3, 1915. He was son of the late Mr and Mrs. Luke Kelly. He is commemorated on Panel 49 and 50 Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Private H. Kelly, 11053, age 18, 3rd Bat., King’s Own (Liverpool Regiment), died on Thursday October 7, 1915. He was son of John and Mary Kelly. He is buried in AD. 1158 Liverpool (Roman Catholic) Cemetery, Lancashire.

Private H. Kelly, 11053, age 18, The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), died on October 7, 1915.

Private Albert Kelly, 71275, age 19, 27th Bat., Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment), died on Saturday October 9, 1915. He was son of Frederick John and Louise Kelly, Hulton, St. Vital, Manitoba. He is commemorated on Panel 24 -26 - 28 - 30 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private H. Kelly, 18448, 1st Bn., Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died on October 11, 1915, buried in Addolorata Cemetery, Malta (on the outskirts of the village of Paola, 5 Km. From Valetta).

Private Norman Kelly, 3424, age 30, 1st/14th Bn., London Regiment (London Scottish), died on Tuesday October 12, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 132, Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. He was son of the late John William and Emily Kelly.

Private William Kelley, 406563, 1st Bat., Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment), died on Wednesday October 13, 1915. He was buried in 1. C. 22 St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private W. J. Kelley, 406563, Canadian Infantry (Ontario Regiment), died on October 13, 1915.

Gunner P. Kelly, 48527, age 25, Royal Garrison Artillery, died on October 18, 1915.

Private Thomas Kelly, 2138, age 29, 5th Bat., Royal Irish Regiment, died on October 23, 1915. He was son of Thomas and Norah Kelly and husband of Julia Kelly, Chapel St., Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. He is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.

Private V. Kelly, 12689, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), died on October 31, 1915.

November 1915

Sergeant J. A. Kelly, DCM 16393, age 45, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on November 8, 1915. He was son of William and Mary Kelly, Castlerock, Co. Derry, and wife of Clara Eleanor Tinsley (formerly Kelly), Cobalt, Ontario, Canada. He is buried in Q. 176614, Brookwood Cemetery Surrey.

Private W. Kelly, 3759, 11th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Thursday November 11, 1915. He is buried in VI. D. 40 Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Able Seaman M. Kelly, KW/10, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, died on November 14, 1915.

Stoker M. Kelly, 3413S, age 25, Royal Naval Reserve, died on December 30, 1915.

Staff Sergeant A. Kelly, 5176, age 19, Australian Army Services Corps, died on November 22, 1915. Staff Sergeant Albert Kelly, 5176, age 19, 12th Coy., Australian Army Service Corp, son of William Francis and Louisa Kelly, Herald Office, Melbourne, Australia, died on November 22, 1915, and is buried in Addolorata Cemetery, nr the village of Paola, Malta.

Corporal Robert Kelly, 7951, 8th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Wednesday November 24, 1915. He is commemorated on Panel 173 to 177 Helles Memorial Turkey.

Private Peter Kelly, 3129, age 21, 9th Bat., Lancashire Fusiliers, died on Saturday November 27, 1915. He was son of Mrs. M. Crosdale, 7 Greystokes St., Stockport. He is commemorated on Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219 Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Private Frederick George Kelly, 2735, age 18, 3rd Bat., London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), died on Sunday November 28, 1915 and is commemorated on Panel 196, Helles Memorial, Turkey. He was son of Mrs Louisa S. A. Kelly, 97 Benwell Road, Holloway, London.

December 1915

Private J. Kelly, 10224, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, son of John and Margaret Kelly, Longford, and husband of Catherine Kelly, 136 Married Quarters, Bordon, Hants, died on Tuesday, December 7, 1915, and is commemorated on Doiran Memorial, Greece. This situated near Doiran Military Cemetery, in the north of Greece, near Yugoslavia.

Private P. Kelly, 5364, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Tuesday December 7, 1915 and is commemorated on Doiran Memorial, Greece.

Private T. Kelly, 5834, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Tuesday, December 7, 1915, and is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.

Able Seaman J. Kelly, Clyde Z/1085, Royal Navy, died on December 8, 1915. Buried in grave XI. D. 11. Redoubt Cemetery, Helles.

Able Seaman John Kelly, SS/2699, H.M.S. Pembroke, Royal Navy, died on Wednesday, December 8, 1915. He was son of Mrs. F. Kelly, 28 Grosvenor Road, Derry. He is buried in Ford Park Cemetery (Formerly Plymouth Old Cemetery), (Pennycomequick), Devon. Church S. 3. 12.

Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. C. Kelly, age 44, 149th Bat., Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment), died on Sunday December 12, 1915. He was son of the late George and Mary Kelly and husband of Susanne F. Kelly of Watford, Ontario. He is buried in Watford (St. James’s Church) Cemetery, Ontario.

Private Patrick Kelly, 4932, age 41, 5th Bat., Connaught Rangers, died on Monday December 13, 1915 and is commemorated on Doiran Memorial, Greece. He was son of James and Margaret Kelly, Goff St., Roscommon, Ireland.

Private J. Kelly, 1925, 5th Bat., Highland Light Infantry, died on Sunday December 19, 1915. He is buried in 111. C. 6. Pink Farm Cemetery, Helles, Turkey.

Steward T. Kelly, age 31, Mercantile Marine, died on December 20, 1915.

August 1916

Private Henry Kelly. 32627. 15th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Died 2 August 1916.
Born Middlesbrough, Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Buried NORTH ORMESBY (ST. JOSEPH'S) ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY.

Rifleman James Kelly. 40635. 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, formerly 17729 the Yorkshire Regiment. Foster son of Jack and Mary Ann Dalton, of 10, Cargo Fleet Rd., Middlesbrough. Killed 10 June 1917. Aged 25.
Born Gildersome (Yorks), Enlisted Middlesbrough, Resided Halifax (Yorks). Commemorated Panel 40, YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL.

Private John Patrick Kelly. 14006. 7th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Son of the late S.M. James Kelly (Depot Northumberland Fusiliers), and Mary Kelly. Died 1 July 1916. Aged 27.
Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Buried FRICOURT BRITISH CEMETERY .

August 1917

Private John Kelly. 8513. 6th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Son of the late Patrick and Mary Kelly, of Argyle St., Middlesbrough. Died 27 August 1917. Aged 38.
Born Hartlepool, Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Commemorated Panel 52 to 54 and 162A, Tyne Cot Memorial.

September 1917.

Serjeant Bernard Kelly. 3/6982. 9th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Died 21 September 1917.
Born Middlesbrough, Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Commemorated Panel 52 to 54 and 162A, Tyne Cot Memorial.

Private James Kelly. 15752. 7th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Son of the late Patrick and Mary Kelly, of Middlesbrough. Died 28 September 1917. Aged 25.
Born Grangetown, Enlisted Frensham, Resided Middlesbrough.
Commemorated Panel 52 to 54 and 162A, Tyne Cot Memorial.

October 1917.

Private John Kelly. 15575. 8th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment. Son of John and Elizabeth Kelly husband of Hannah Kelly, of 28, Victoria St., Newport Rd., Middlesbrough. Died 19 October 1917. Aged 33.
Born Middlesbrough, Enlisted Middlesbrough.
Commemorated Panel 52 to 54 and 162A, Tyne Cot Memorial.

Our thanks to historian, Dr. J. M. Kelly who researched the above .

We have added a few today. Keep them coming. Ed. April 2014

Military Cemetery Grangegorman. Dublin.

While the war was in progress in Europe, things were not to quite here at home.
The War of Independence and the 1916 rising, Easter Week. We have listed the known Kellys who took an active part.

General Post Office, O’Connell Street

G.P.O. garrison 58 KIA. 323 Survivors. Total
combatants 381
15% KIA
Kelly Barber, Kathleen J
Kelly Edward
Kelly frank
Kelly John
Kelly Joseph
O Ceallaigh Eamonn
O’Kelly Fergus F
O’Kelly Joseph
O’Kelly Sean T

Boland’s mill

Boland’s Mill 29 KIA 144 Survivors. Total combatants 173 17% KIA

City Hall 30 KIA and 30 Survivors. Total combatants 60. 50% KIA
Kelly Bessie

Four Courts

Four Courts 53 KIA 370 Survivors. Total
combatants 423 12.5% KIA
Kelly Joseph
Kelly Michael
Kelly Patrick


Jacob's Factory

Jacob’s 36 KIA 140 Survivors. Total combatants 176 20% KIA
Kelly Henry
Kelly John E.
O Ceallaigh Padraig
O Ceallaigh Seosamh S.


Marrowbone Lane

Greene Josephine nee Kelly
Kelly William

Mendicity Institute


Roe's Distillery

Stephen's Green

Stephen’s green 29 KIA 108 Survivors. Total combatants 137 21% KIA

Kelly Unknown
Kelly Annie
Kelly James
O’Kelly Michael

South Dublin Union

Dublin Union 35 KIA and 165 Survivors. Total combatants 200 17.5%KIA
Kelly Joseph F.

13 Dead 46 Survivors. Total combatants 59 22% KIA
(no record of Kelly’s casualties)

Kelly civilians killed during the fighting.Approx 316 civilians died as a result of the rising during Easter week. Some caught in the cross fire, some onlookers trampled to death in the panic around the City when the fighting stared. Some were looters and shot by both sides. Some willfully murdered.

Kelly, Mary aged 12, 128 Townsend
Street, Dublin. bu. Deansgrange.
Kelly, D., .Jervis Street Hospital.
Kelly, L. aged 50, 1 Lower
Clanbrassil Street.
Kelly, James aged18, 205
Phibsborough Road.

Indian Mutiny.

On June 28 th 1920, elements of the Connaught Rangers, who were stationed in Wellington Barracks, Jalandhar, Punjab, refused to go on duty. They were protesting about the conduct of the “Black and Tans’ and the imposition of martial law back in Ireland. The situation deteriorated after an unsuccessful attempt to gain weapons from the armory. During this incident two of the attackers were shot dead. A young Pvt. Daly was identified as the ring leader. He was later court - martialed and executed by firing squad. Kelly’s who took part in the Indian Mutiny.

Private John Kelly
Private Patrick Kelly 7762/7144064 (32599)Sgt.
Patrick Kelly. Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry 5858 (32292).

The following is the list of Kelly's who were KIA in the Korean War of 1950 - 1953, in the US Army fighting under a UN mandate.


100 Beautiful Colourised Photos of WW1 for the 1918-2018 Centenary

I began colourising black and white photos professionally in 2014, coinciding with the centenary of the outbreak of WW1 in 1914. Around the world there was a renewed interest in a war that had not been fresh in the public memory for many years.

Since 2014, I have been very fortunate to have been able to work with some high profile clients around the world on exhibitions, press articles and books commemorating significant WW1 anniversaries. And I have also been honored to work on clients’ personal family photos, which all have unique insights into what was truly the first global conflict.

To mark the centenary of the end of the First World War, I have decided to collate 100 images I’ve colorized in tribute to the men and women who lived through the war, and those who lost their lives.

I have chosen to include men and women of several nationalities, races and religions, as the entire world was affected by the war, and I hope the photos will show an insight into the lesser known stories and events.

1. An unknown soldier, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

Some of the images you may be familiar with, but many have never been published before.

I have tried where possible to give credit to the original photographers, and the owners/custodians of the original photographs. Where no credit is given, this is due to a lack of information and I would be happy to amend details if they come to light in future.

2. A B-type bus converted into a pigeon loft enabling messages to be sent from the front line back to headquarters. The BBC reports that 100,000 carrier pigeons were used as messengers throughout WW1 and records show they delivered 95% of their messages correctly. Originally colorized for the Open University.

My thanks goes to the Facebook page WW1 Colourised Photos, a group of fellow friends and colorizers have provided me with helpful advice. It’s impossible to know everything, as hard as I try!

I would especially like to thank my loyal clients and friends who have given me permission to include their personal family photos in this collection as they are by far the most touching images, and they are the most satisfying to ‘bring to life’ in color.

3. Royal Garrison Artillery gunners pushing a light railway truck filled with shells, behind Zillebeke, 1st October 1917. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

All colorized images are © Tom Marshall (PhotograFix) 2014-2018. Original image credits are given after each photo.

Please consider making a donation to the Royal British Legion’s Poppy Appeal, or to a local memorial appeal in your home country.

4. An unknown soldier of the British West Indies regiment, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

5. Bahadur (Bhaz Gul) was a hero of the 59th Scinde Rifles, who was promoted in the field for gallantry at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle (10th–13th March 1915). With an officer and two other men, he was in a captured German trench when volunteers were called for to rescue some wounded men. Bahadur volunteered and, though exposed to heavy fire, succeeded in rescuing one man, and went back again to rescue a second, when he was hit by a German bullet and was severely wounded. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library.

6. An unknown soldier from ‘A’ Squadron, the North Irish Horse Regiment on horseback, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

7. An unknown Lance Corporal in the Royal Army Medical Corps, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

8. Original caption: ‘A Boche prisoner, wounded and muddy, coming in on the 13th.’ A British soldier helps a wounded German prisoner walk along a railway track, 1916.

A man, possibly an official French war photographer is shown behind them, holding a camera and tripod. The derogatory term for a German, ‘Boche’ or ‘Bosch’, originates from the French slang ‘alboche’, which was two words ‘Allemand’ (German) and ‘caboche’ (pate, head) put together. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

9. A shell bursts off the beach of Gallipoli, 1915. The caption on the original image was written by Dr. Andrew Horne of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC), from Ballinasloe, Co. Galway, Ireland.

The image comes from an album donated to the National Museum of Ireland by Dr. Horne’s two daughters, Patricia and Margaret. Taking personal photographs at the time was technically difficult and also illegal, unless taken by officers. Dr. Horne went on to survive Gallipoli and the War. He later wrote “Nobody can believe we had such a time and came through it alive, but here we are”. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

10. Irish soldiers of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers prepare to go to war. Taken at Collins Barracks, Dublin in 1915. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

11. An unknown soldier.

12. The final resting place of Zeppelin LZ 59 (bombing code L20) known as the ‘Raider of Loughborough’ after her part in an attack on the English Midlands.

On 31st January 1916 nine airships, including L20, left Germany and Denmark in order to attack the docks at Liverpool, which would have shocked the British public due to the long range of the attack.

The airships never reached Liverpool and, due to a miscalculation, instead dropped their bombs on several towns including Tipton, Wednesbury, Walsall, Burton upon Trent, Nottingham, Derby, and Loughborough. L20 killed an estimated 10 people in Loughborough including Mary Anne Page and two of her children, whose names can be seen on a plaque in Loughborough Carillon Tower & War Memorial Museum.

On 2nd May 1916, L20 began its second bombing raid on Britain with the intention of attacking factories and railways in Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Hartlepool, and targeting enemy warships near Edinburgh. However, engine problems and strong winds led the airship to veer off course.

High winds blew her out into the North Sea and to neutral Norway where she crash landed into Hafrsfjord near Stavanger, Norway. Original image by Hans Henriksen / Stavanger City Archive.

13. Sappers mining underground, originally colorized for Iain McHenry’s book ‘Subterranean Sappers’, published by Uniform Press.

14. Thomas Rose of the 6th Iniskilling Dragoon Guards. Thomas was 16 when he volunteered in 1914 and survived the Great War. Thank you to his Great Nephew Vic Wright for permission to include this photo.

15. Arthur James Langran served with the Leicestershire Regiment (later Royal Leicestershire Regiment) during the First World War.

His son Peter Francis Langran served with the same regiment during the Second World War. Thanks to Richard Langran, the grandson of AJ Langran, and son of Peter, who gave me permission to include this photo.

16. Sgt. Ernest Leonard, from Plymouth in Devon. In addition to working at HM Dockyard Devonport, he was a defender on the Torquay United championship football team in 1909.

In 1912, he went to Toronto, Canada, where he became the captain of the Devonian Football Club in the Toronto District Football League. When war broke out Ernest enlisted with the 19th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force.

He fought with the Canadian Corps at the battles of the Somme and Arras and was twice-wounded in trench warfare. Thank you to Ernest’s grandson, G.E. Benton for permission to include this photo.

17. Second Lieutenant Albert Charles Fricker of the 10th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment (Hull Pals).

Albert attended Reading University College from 1912-1915 where he took intermediate science and graduated with BSc in 1915. After graduating, he signed up to fight in France, and died on his 23rd birthday, on the 27th February 1917.

Original Image courtesy of the University of Reading archives. Included with the kind permission of Chris Smith.

18. Joshua Riley and unknown soldiers, Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

19. Canadian cyclists, the front cover image of Colin Kirsch’s history of military bicycles in the Great War ‘Bad Teeth No Bar’.

The book takes its name from a WW1 recruitment poster, which promoted the cycle corps for those men whose bad teeth would deem them unfit for general service. The book is published by Uniform Press.

20. An unknown soldier from the Army Service Corps.

The ASC later became the RASC and was responsible for land, coastal and lake transport, air dispatch, barracks administration. Also the Army Fire Service, staffing headquarters’ units, supply of food, water, fuel and domestic materials such as clothing, furniture and stationery and the supply of technical and military equipment.

Photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

21. Robert Swalwell, aged 31, from Yarraville, an inner western suburb of Melbourne, Australia.

Robert was a keen pigeoner along with his brothers, and was a husband and father of two young daughters. He joined the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in 1916 during a recruitment drive following the Gallipoli tragedy in 1915.

Robert died in unknown circumstances in France on 3rd May 1917. Thank you to Glenn Poolen for allowing me to include this photo.

22. North African soldiers enjoy lunch possibly on farming leave in El Kseur. Note the khaki style uniforms issued to Algerian units. Stood at the back is Charles Déjalma Moucan. This photo is included with the permission of Moucan’s grandson Andre Chissel.

23. A lieutenant of the Siamese Transport Corps, in the village of Geinsheim, Neustadt, Germany in 1918.

The Kingdom of Siam (now Thailand) is a relatively unknown member of the allied forces during WW1, but after joining the war on the side of Britain and France, Siam sent an Expeditionary Force to France to serve on the Western Front.

24. Damage in the yard of the home of vet and blacksmith Mr T.H. Walden in East Street off Albert Street, King’s Lynn, following a Zeppelin raid which took place on 19th January 1915.

Despite the huge amount of damage caused by the bomb, the whole family – mother, father and three children – escaped with their lives. Next door, however, three of the four occupants suffered injury but only one needed hospital treatment.

Thank you to Ian Castle, author of ‘Zeppelin Onslaught’ for the above information. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library.

25. An unknown soldier, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

26. This is from the first Zeppelin raid on Britain, which took place on 19th January 1915.

Two Zeppelins appeared over East Anglia. Zeppelin L 3 bombed Great Yarmouth and later Zeppelin L 4 appeared over King’s Lynn. This photo is reported to show Mr Fayers who lived at 11 Bentinck Street, King’s Lynn.

A bomb exploded on 12 Bentinck Street, killing 14-year-old Percy Goate. His parents and 4-year-old sister survived. Next door at No. 11, Mr and Mrs Fayers had spent the evening with Alice Gazley who lived nearby.

When they heard explosions, Alice ran out of No. 11 and was killed although buried in the rubble, Mr and Mrs Fayers sustained only minor injuries, Mr Fayers was ‘cut on head’.

Thank you to Ian Castle, author of ‘Zeppelin Onslaught’ for the above information. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library.

27. A horse and soldier transporting boots.

The path is inches deep in wet mud discernible by the deep imprint round the soldiers boot and the fact that the horses hooves are no longer visible. Rather than cloth puttees though he is wearing long lace-up boots.

The horse is absolutely laden with rubber trench waders. Horses, due to their reliability and ability to travel over most terrains were crucial to transportation during WW1. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

28. An unknown soldier, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

29. Soldiers inspect a garden and destroyed cherry tree, following a raid made by a single German aeroplane on Colchester on 21st February 1915.

The bomb landed in the back garden of 41 Butt Road, the home of Quartermaster-Sergeant Rabjohn of 20th Hussars and his family. Rabjohn, his wife and their child escaped injury.

Thank you to Ian Castle, author of ‘Zeppelin Onslaught’ for the above information. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library.

30. This image belonged to my Great Grandad Charles Smith Wallhead, and was signed ‘Yours Frank Sheard, Aug 20, 1917’.

From his cap badge I’ve been able to find out that Frank served with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1914-1918 in the British Army.

Sadly, I also found out that Frank was killed on 28th August 1918, aged 21 and is buried at the Reninghelst New Military Cemerery in Belgium.

He was the son of Joe Lister Sheard and Alice Sheard of 5 Brick Bank, Almondbury, Huddersfield, West Riding of Yorkshire.

31. Men of the 8th Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry playing cards near Ypres, 1st October 1917. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

32. This image belonged to my Great Grandad Charles Smith Wallhead, and was signed ‘Yours Sincerely J A Lovell’.

From his shoulder badge I’ve worked out that he served with the Lincolnshire Yeomanry, the same as my Great Grandad, and by searching online have found a record for John Arthur Lovell.

33. Soldiers inspect damage following a raid made by a single German aeroplane on Colchester on 21st February 1915.

Thank you to Ian Castle, author of ‘Zeppelin Onslaught’ for the above information. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library.

34. An unknown soldier of the Durham Light Infantry.

He is sporting the ribbon of the Military Cross and may well have been a well known man, photographed at Vignacourt, France.

Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

35. Charles Déjalma Moucan, a tirailleur (French for ‘sharpshooter’) of the 4e Régiment de Tirailleurs Algériens (4th Algerian Rifle Regiment) Algerian, Sousse Tunisia circa 1916.

During WW1 tirailleurs from North African territories served on the Western Front as well as at Gallipoli, incurring heavy losses. Note the “dog tag” on his wrist – two were issued one for the wrist, the other was worn around the neck.

The Great Mosque of Paris was constructed afterwards in honour of the Muslim tirailleurs who had fought for France. This photo is included with the permission of Moucan’s grandson Andre Chissel.

36. French cyclists, the back cover image of Colin Kirsch’s book ‘Bad Teeth No Bar’, published by Uniform Press.

37. An unknown soldier of the Army Service Corps, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

38. Soldiers after crossing the River Somme.

According to the photograph’s original caption these soldiers are the first to have crossed the River Somme. Some of them are clambering up a temporary walkway. Others in the background manage to scramble up the embankment. The foreground is littered with debris.

Scenes such as this were commonly used as propaganda, intended to boost morale amongst the troops. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

39. ‘Their home on the Somme.’ Two officers looking out of a small shelter they appear to have made for themselves.

It seems to have been made of a mixture of corrugated iron, wood and canvas or tar-paper. As it is built above ground, this must have been well away from the front-line trenches.

This is one of a number of photographs which illustrate the degree to which shelter was left to the individual soldier. For officers this was, however, relieved by their greater freedom off-duty to go to nearby towns and villages, or on longer leave to visit Paris.

When billets were available in civilian houses, officers again had the better conditions. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

40. An unknown soldier, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

41. This photograph shows a group of soldiers standing in the entrance to a dugout.

Other men are outside, standing beside a washing line with towels on it. A pot is steaming on a brazier made of a tin drum.

The cap and collar badges of the men are not distinct but appear to vary, suggesting they are from more than one unit. This rather domestic scene appears well removed from the reality of the trenches at the Front.

It may have been intended to counter criticism of the campaign by implying that it was better organised than was the case. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

42. An unknown soldier, photographed at Vignacourt, France.

I was drawn to the eyes in this photograph. They look like the eyes of a man who has seen too much. When colourising the images it’s impossible to know the subject’s eye colour from the black & white image.

As his hair is light and fair, blue eyes are a guess, and in turn make the image more striking. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

43. Artillery stripped trees and a signboard pointing the way for pack transport.

The other-worldliness of this ravaged landscape at Courcelette, shrouded in clouds of dust or smoke, leaves a lasting impression.

The foreground is littered with many objects, including an abandoned carriage and a sign stating ‘pack transport this way.’ Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

44. An unknown soldier (possibly of the Leeds Rifles) sporting an injured hand, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

45. British soldiers in a German trench, Messines, Belgium, 1917.

Three officers stand outside the mouth of the trench whilst one sits on top of it and one stands inside it.

They all appear happy or relaxed, presumably as they have just captured a German trench and all the supplies in it. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

46. An explosion taking place on the Somme.

According to the existing caption it is a controlled explosion set up by the Royal Engineers, to clear the way for the advance. A uniformed soldier, possibly a member of the Royal Engineers, sits on a wooden post watching the explosion.

A retreating army often laid obstacles and sabotaged any equipment or weapons they left behind, in an attempt to hinder any advance.

Royal Engineers, as well as taking part in the fighting, were also responsible for ‘combat engineering’ finding solutions to engineering problems on the battlefield. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

47. Original caption: ‘Some jolly gunners and their pet.’

A group of men from the Royal Regiment of Artillery, photographed alongside a long-barreled field gun, 1916. For the occasion, they have chalked the words, ‘Somme gun’ on the side of the barrel.

The men are well wrapped with non-uniform scarves, gloves and a balaclava. In purely military terms, the heavy artillery of both sides was in many ways more important than any other weapon.

It could fire into the opposing trenches with little risk to their own side and could effectively keep the enemy in the trenches. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

48. Guy Archibald Forrest grew up in Cheltenham and was educated at Uppingham School, Rutland.

He served in the South African Constabulary as a 3rd Class Trooper between 1901 and 1903, fighting in the Boer War for which he was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal.

When WW1 broke, having emigrated to Canada, Forrest enlisted in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry and in December 1914 embarked with the Canadian Expeditionary Force to France, where he fought in the frontline trenches, and was promoted to Sergeant.

After being granted a commission to the British Army, Forrest spent 1916 serving in Northern Egypt, and in August 1916, he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps as a Flying Officer (Observer) attached to 14 Squadron, 5th Wing.

He performed reconnaissance in the Hejaz region of Western Arabia in support of Lawrence of Arabia during the early stages of the Arab Revolt.

In May 1917, having been promoted to Lieutenant and attached to 57 Reserve Squadron, 20th Reserve Wing, Forrest took part in a Special Duty Service Flight performing reconnaissance in the Northern Sinai region of Egypt.

For the remainder of 1917, he was Recording Officer for 111 Squadron, 5th (later 40th) Wing, stationed in the Suez. Returning to Britain in December 1917, Forrest was attached to Home Defence Wing, initially in 39 Squadron whose duties were to intercept Zeppelin bombers attacking London.

He was subsequently attached to 189 Night Training Squadron and then 153 Squadron shortly before relinquishing his commission in January 1919.

For his services during World War 1 Lieutenant Forrest was awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, and Victory Medal.

Thank you to Guy’s Great Grandson Giles Forrest for permission to include his photograph and story here.

49. King George V sitting next to an army commander, Thiepval, France on the site where Thiepval Chateau once stood.

The army commander to his right is pointing into the distance and, according to the original caption, recounting the capture of Thiepval.

This photograph was taken by John Warwick Brooke during one of the King’s many visits to the Western Front. The village of Thiepval was completely destroyed during the Somme Offensive of 1916.

A memorial to the missing of the Somme, with no known grave, now stands near where Thiepval Chateau once stood. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

50. An 18 pounder gun being hauled through the mud at Broodseinde Ridge to a position further forward, in support of the advancing Australians, two days before the initial attack on Passchendaele Ridge, in the Ypres sector.

Identified, left of the gun, left to right: Gunner (Gnr) W E Drummond Gnr J Brannon (to Drummond’s right) Gnr C V Cox (in front of Brannon) two men unidentified behind Cox 34401 Gnr A Hewitt (in front of Cox) Dvr A C Sampson (standing on wheel, back to camera) Gnr G G Dowling (foreground, pulling rope on front wheel).

Right side of gun, left to right: Dvr Hughes Dvr F Peace unidentified unidentified Bombardier T (R ?) Garniss Sergeant W Reynolds (extreme right, standing back).

51. 6’ 7” ‘giant’ of the Austro Hungarian army, Corporal Istvan Kovacs served 2 years in Vienna as bodyguard of Franz Joseph I, Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary.

Istvan was chosen to be a bodyguard as he was the strongest man in his county. Throughout the Great War he served in the 69th Imperial and Royal Infantry Regiment.

During his service on the Eastern Front, Istvan fell ill for a short period but returned successfully to his farms in Hungary and to his two sons.

This photo was taken in 1918 and shows him wearing his Charles cross medal. Thank you to Istvan’s Great Grandson Peter Kovacs for allowing me to include his photo and story here.

52. A soldier of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry washing clothes in an Officer’s canvas bath, Ypres-Comines Canal, 1 October 1917. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

53. An unknown Australian soldier.

54. A British soldier talks to a local farm worker, somewhere in Passchendaele, 1917. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

55. A Māori sergeant wearing the badges of the New Zealand Native Contingent, Paris, 1917. This image was colourised for Fair Dinkum Books’ Onward Project.

56. Open air cookery in a steel helmet near Miraumont-le-Grand.

Three officers making themselves comfortable, during the Battle of the Somme, 1916. Steel helmets had many more uses than the War Office might have intended. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

57. Men of the 6th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, resting beneath a tarpaulin, Ypres-Comines Canal, 1st October 1917. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

58. New Zealanders walking wounded at the Battle of Broodseinde ridge, the most successful Allied attack of Passchendaele.

A YMCA NZ stall just behind the lines allowed the men to get something to drink. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland.

59. Harry Colebourn was born in Birmingham in 1887 and moved to Canada when he was 18, eventually moving to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

At the outbreak of the First World War, Colebourn returned to England as a veterinarian and soldier with the Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps.

As he was heading across Canada by train to embark for England, Colebourn came across a hunter in White River, Ontario who had a female black bear cub for sale, having killed the cub’s mother.

Colebourn purchased the cub for $20, named her “Winnie” after his adopted home town, and took her across the Atlantic with him to Salisbury Plain where she became the unofficial mascot of the CAVC.

When Colebourn shipped out to France, he kept Winnie the bear at London Zoo. It was at London Zoo that the author A. A. Milne and his son Christopher Robin encountered Winnie. Christopher was so taken with her that he named his teddy bear after her, which became the inspiration for Milne’s fictional character in the books Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) and The House at Pooh Corner (1928).

60. New Zealand soldiers in the Ypres Salient. I was commissioned to colourise this image for the cover for ‘Passchendaele: The Day by Day Account’ by Chris McCarthy, published by Uniform Press.

61. Soldiers build a new dug out as they advance. Originally colourised for Uniform Press and used with permission.

62. This official photograph of a warm, dry, well-fed, smiling ‘Tommy Atkins’ at the front created an impression far removed from reality. Spirits were high initially however, when it was thought that the war would be over in a matter of months.

63. A group of Indian soldiers armed in a trench, 1915. The hoods they are wearing are gas masks the First World War was the first war in which manufactured poison gas was used as a weapon on a large scale. Original photo by H.D. Girdwood, courtesy of the British Library. Originally colourised for the Open University.

64. An interior view of the dugout occupied by officers of the 105th Howitzer Battery, Belgium: Flanders, West-Vlaanderen, Ypres, Hill 60 – 27th August 1917.

Left to right: Captain Leslie Russell Blake MC Polar Medal (died of wounds on 3rd October 1918) Lieutenant David Ballantyne Ikin Major Herbert Norman Morris, Officer Commanding.

Australian photographer and adventurer Frank Hurley was a master of light and shadow. He participated in a number of expeditions to Antarctica and served as an official photographer with Australian forces during both world wars.

65. Kálmán Balogh was born in Hungary on the 3rd of July 1897, here pictured in 1918.

In WW1 Kálmán served in the Royal Hungarian Hussars and on the 1st November 1915 was promoted to the rank of Főhadnagy (Lieutenant).

He was awarded the Bronze Medal for Bravery and Karl Troop Cross, in 1917 & 1918 respectively serving in the Serbian Campaign. Thank you to Kalman’s grandson Andrew Gerencser for permission to include the photo here.

66. Two New Zealand soldiers look out of a dugout at the front line, Hebuterne in France.

The photograph was taken on the 13th May 1918 by Henry Armytage Sanders. The sign above the entrance reads “The Diggers rest. Board and residence. Cold showers when it is wet. Herr Fritz’s Orchestra plays at frequent intervals.”

67. An unknown soldier with Two Years Overseas Service chevrons on right sleeve.

And a Good Conduct (Three Years) chevron on his left sleeve, photographed at Vignacourt, France. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

68. Guardsman James Murray, service no. 11414, 2nd Battalion Scots Guards. He was killed in the Battle of Festubert on 16th May 1915. Thank you to Dean Atwell for permission to include the photo here.

69. Egyptian Expeditionary Force soldiers pose in front of the Great Sphinx and pyramids of Giza, Egypt. Thank you to the author Stuart Hadaway for permission to include the photo here.

70. Troops moving at Eventide. Men of a Yorkshire regiment on the march. This photo was taken by Ernest Brooks. Original image courtesy of the National Library of Scotland. 71. Horses pull makeshift sleds through the mud. Originally colourised for Uniform Press and included with permission.

72. Soldiers of 3rd Canadian Infantry Battalion with their unit’s goat mascot in August 1916. Originally colourised for the Open University.

73. Soldiers from the 1st Australian Imperial Force, shown at a military base in their home country around 1916. Originally colourised for the Open University.

74. Men of the 177 Tunneling Company Royal Engineers, originally colourised for the front cover of Iain McHenry’s book ‘Subterranean Sappers’, published by Uniform Press.

75. A listening post leaving the trench, most likely a staged photo. Photographer H.D. Girdwood. Originally colourised for the Open University.

76. An unknown British Colonel in Vignacourt, France.

He is wearing the Military Cross medal ribbon, but I have not been able to work out the other ribbons.

Based on his age, rank and the shades of grey, I have painted these as Boer War campaign medals, though this is merely speculation as I don’t know his identity.

Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

77. A German Field Artillery crew poses with a 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 field gun in 1914. Originally colourised for the Open University.

78. A Canadian soldier and his horse wear gas masks at the Canadian Army Veterinary Corps Headquarters. Originally colourised for the Open University.

79. Irish Soldiers and civilians outside Collins Barracks, Dublin. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

80. Canadian poet, physician, author, artist and soldier John McCrae wrote arguably the most famous piece of literature of World War 1.

He was inspired to write “In Flanders Fields” on the 3rd of May, 1915, after presiding over the funeral of friend and fellow soldier Alexis Helmer, who died in the Second Battle of Ypres.

Its reference to poppies that grew over the graves of fallen soldiers led to the rise of remembrance poppies issued by the Royal British Legion, the Royal Canadian Legion, the American Legion Auxiliary and other associations around the world. Lest we forget.

81. A soldier receives a haircut from an Alpine barber on the Albanian front. Originally colourised for the Open University.

82. Irish soldiers with their German captors at Sennelager prisoner of war camp, 1914/1915.

This is most likely a staged propaganda photograph, although reports do show that officers were treated better than enlisted men.

According to one prisoner’s account of Sennelager camp in September 1914, “it was an open field enclosed with wire… there were no tents or coverings in it of any kind. There were about 2,000 prisoners in it – all British.

We lay on the ground with only one blanket for three men.” Seated at the left of the table is Major William Egan DSO OBE, of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The above info is thanks to his granddaughter Patricia Harty, editor-in chief of the Irish America Magazine. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

83. My Great Grandad, Lance Corporal Charles Smith Wallhead.

84. Royal Dublin Fusiliers opening provisions, including Fray Bentos tinned meat and Jacob’s Biscuits. Taken at Collins Barracks, Dublin in 1915. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

85. A group of Irish soldiers recuperating with nurses c1917.

Pictured are two different nursing organisations, the Territorial Force Nursing Service (TFNS) and the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS).

The TFNS wore a blue grey cape with a scarlet trim, and just visible on the uniforms of the nurses to the left of the image is a small silver ‘T’ which defines them as such.

The nurses to the right of the picture are QAIMNS with scarlet cuff bands and a scarlet cape. They are wearing the QAIMNS cape badge (or medal) (which differentiates her from the QAIMNS Reserve who had a different type of badge.)

The badge or medal was part of the uniform and was to be worn at all times. The two scarlet bands on the cuff show them to be a nursing sisters rather than matrons. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

86. My Great Grandad Charles Martin King Parsons and his brother Maurice John Parsons, dated 1916.

Charles Martin King is dressed in a fusilier uniform, and later went on to join the Royal Flying Corps and was promoted to 2nd Lt. In the RAF in April 1920.

In the Second World War he was given a chaplaincy in the Royal Army Chaplains’ Dept on 6th November 1943 and was one of the first to enter Bergen Belsen prison camp after liberation.

Maurice (seated) was a Private 528 in the 33rd Battalion, B Company of the First Australian Imperial Force, (marked by the small green & black disk on his shoulder).

His unit embarked from Sydney, new South Wales on 4th May 1916 with the intention of heading to Egypt, but en route they were directed (via Durban, Cape Town and Dakar) to England, arriving on 9th July 1916.

As this photo is dated 1916, and was taken in the village of Long Buckby, Northamptonshire, it leads me to believe that this photo was taken that summer when the brothers had a brief chance to meet up (during Maurice’s training period), before his battalion went on to fight in France in November 1916.

87. Sgt. Tom Millar and his sweetheart Barbara, during WW1. Sgt. Millar served with the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry in France, and with the Camel Corps in Egypt. Thank you to Tom’s grandson John Wilson for permission to include the photo here.

88. Soldiers demonstrating the correct use of gas masks, intended to show stages in adjustment of a Small Box Respirator (SBR), 1916. Original image © The National Museum of Ireland.

89. Charles Déjalma Moucan, of the 4th Algerian Rifle Regiment in 1918.

Charles would go on to be awarded the medals Croix de Guerre and Croix du Combattant and was called up again in WW2 aged 45 in the pay corps.

The lanyard or “fourragere” is in the colour of the Legion of Honour – In order to receive such a lanyard, a Regiment had to receive six unit citations and only 11 French Regiments received six unit citations during the war.

This photo is included with the permission of Moucan’s grandson Andre Chissel.

90. Alfred William Will was a serving police constable in Sutherland, Scotland when he enlisted on 15th June 1915, posted to the Royal Army Medical Corps.

Prior to the war Alfred had served with the British Red Cross Society during the First Balkan War in 1913. During WW1 he served 1 year with the 5th Sutherland Highland Rifle Volunteers in France and Flanders, obtained a commission and was promoted to Lieut.

Special Lists (Interpreter) in July 1917. Alfred married Marion Sutherland on 3rd May 1917 and they had a daughter, Margaret on 11th February 1918. In 1918 Alfred was attached as interpreter to the South Persian Rifles where he was promoted to captain and awarded the Military Cross.

He was killed in an uprising on 25th May 1918. The medal ribbon shown in the photo is his Red Cross Medal. Thanks to Alfred’s Great Great Nephew Alasdair Will for his story and permission to include the photo here.

91. Soldiers of the Siamese Transport Corps, in the village of Geinsheim, Neustadt, Germany in 1918.

The Siamese saw front line action in the middle of September 1918, shortly before the end of the war. When this photo was taken, Siamese troops were contributing to the occupation of the Rhineland, and took over control of the town of Neustadt.

Original images kindly provided from the old collections of Geinsheim families by Norbert Kästel of Geinsheim Heimatverein.

Thank you to Stephen Martin who commissioned the colourised version for the upcoming book ‘Soldiers of Siam’ by Khwan Phusrisom and Stephen Martin, being published by Silkworm Books.

92. Kálmán Balogh pictured in 1914. In WW1 Kálmán served in the Royal Hungarian Hussars. Thank you to Kalman’s grandson Andrew Gerencser for permission to include the photo here.

93. An army chaplain conducts a burial service while a burial party stand, paying their respects, at the Battle of Guillemont, 4th September 1916.

94. A female British munitions worker makes shells for the soldiers fighting at the front during WW1.

More than 1.6 million women took on traditionally male jobs during the war as male workers flooded into recruiting offices and were shipped to the front line in France.

950,000 women worked in dangerous munitions factories such as this, producing 80% of the UK’s armaments and were known as ‘Munitionettes’ or canaries, due to the yellowing effects that working with sulphur had on the skin.

Poor working conditions and inadequate safety equipment resulted in around 400 deaths, including an incident in January 1917 when 73 people were killed by an explosion in a London munitions factory that also flattened 900 surrounding homes.

95. On 7th May 1915, the RMS Lusitania ocean liner, travelling from New York to Liverpool, was hit by a torpedo fired from a German U-boat.

The ship sank off the coast of Ireland, killing approximately 1,200 people, including 94 children. The sinking of the ‘Lusi’, one of the largest, fastest and most luxurious passenger liners of its day, caused widespread shock and outrage.

The anti-German sentiment it provoked was used as a recruitment tool in the British war effort and helped to shift public opinion in the United States against Germany, leading them to enter the war in 1917.

The German government claimed that Lusitania was a legitimate target due to the war supplies she was carrying – as were many other British ships. However, British and American enquiries later declared the sinking to have been unlawful.

The colour scheme shown was from an earlier voyage as reports suggest that on her fateful voyage, the funnels had been painted black as a form of wartime camouflage.

96. Soldiers, probably from the 12th Battalion, the East Surrey Regiment, in a British communication trench in Ploegsteert Wood, during the Battle of Messines, 11th June 1917.

97. Edna C. Smith and William D. Cookson, an American soldier during the First World War.

They were sweethearts who later married and became farmers in New Brunswick, Canada and Down East Maine. Thank you to Diana Haynes for permission to include the photo here.

98. On 22nd May 1915, the Quintinshill rail disaster occurred near Gretna Green, Scotland at Quintinshill on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle.

The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 and injured 246 and remains the worst rail crash in British history in terms of loss of life.

Those killed were mainly Territorial soldiers from the 1/7th (Leith) Battalion, the Royal Scots heading for Gallipoli. The precise death toll was never established with confidence as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire.

The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later.

Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops.

99. Welsh Guardsmen in a reserve trench, Guillemont, September 1916.

The Battle of Guillemont was part of the Battle of the Somme, the largest battle of the First World War, with over 1,000,000 men wounded or killed over both sides.

German writer and philosopher Ernst Jünger’s account of Guillemont in his memoir ‘Storm of Steel’, may well sum up how many were feeling at the time. “All was swathed in black smoke, which was in the ominous under lighting of coloured flares.

Because of racking pains in our heads and ears, communication was possible only by odd, shouted words… When day dawned we were astonished to see, by degrees, what a sight surrounded us.”

Original photo © The Welsh Guards Archives, colourised for the book ‘Bearskins, Bayonets and Body Armour’.

100. Sidney Carr and unknown soldiers, Vignacourt, France.

Sidney was also an unknown soldier for 100 years, until the BBC’s The One Show shared the images and he was identified by his grandson Geoff Spicer.

I was asked to colourise this image by the One Show’s production team. Original image courtesy of Ross Coulthart, author of ‘The Lost Tommies’ & The Kerry Stokes Collection – Louis & Antoinette Thuillier.

All colorized images © Tom Marshall (PhotograFix) 2014-2018.

You can also follow PhotograFix on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

If you managed to get this far, well done and thank you. If you’d like to support my colorizing work, several prints are available to purchase here. Please share this blog post with friends and family, as 90% of my work comes from word of mouth.


Yorkshire Light Infantry guard railway junction, Dublin 1914 - History

One of a set of scrap metal sculptures at Bradford Industrial Museum.

Lancashire United's ex Ribble Olympian 2173 is the regular bus on the 973 service, which runs from Eccleshill, Hoddlesden and Darwen to ST Wilfrids CEHS, Blackburn, I photographed her early this morning in Darwen

Eccleshill by Michael De Greasley

All information is provided in good faith but, on occasions errors may occur. Should this be the case, if new information can be verified please supply it to the author and corrections will then be made.

This memorial has been compiled with additional information by kind permission of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Greengates War Memorial, Yorkshire

It is situated in the Garden of Remembrance

BARRACLOUGH Francis (Memorial has Frank) Private 4337, 1st Border Regiment died 11/9/1915. Lived at 38 Regent Street, Greengates, at rest in North Front Cemetery, Gibraltar.

BAXTER Charles Alfred, Private 235901, 9th West Yorkshire Regiment, formerly Pte 2559 Yorkshire Hussars. Born at Apperley Bridge, Yorkshire and died 10/10/1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

BAXTER William (Unable to find the correct record for this person listed with the CWGC)

BLOMFIELD William, Private 201010, 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders died 25/3/1918 aged 24. He is at rest in Doullens Communal Cemetery Extension No.1, Somme, France.

BUCKLE Ernest, Private 14518, 8th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 1/8/1916 aged 20. He is at rest in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

CLAYTON Percy, Private 26176, 12th West Yorkshire Regiment, Born at Bramley, Yorkshire Died 18/10/1916 aged 23. He is at rest in Puchevillers British Cemetery, Somme, France.

CLEAVER Joseph Henry, Gunner 38934, 70th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died 23/3/1918. He is at rest in Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery, Arras, France.

COCKSHOTT Edmund, Private 26189, 5th King's Shropshire Light Infantry died 1/5/1917. He is at rest in Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, France.

COLLINS David, Private 38049, 15/17th West Yorkshire Regiment. Born at Eccleshill Yorks He died on the 12/4/1918 aged 20, and he is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

CORDINGLEY Percy, Blacksmith's Mate M/13562, Royal Navy of H.M.S. Cumberland. He was born on the 7th July 1892 at Bradford and died 27/9/1918. He is at rest in Holy Trinity Churchyard, Idle, (near Greengates), Yorkshire.

DOOLEY Ernest, Private 325911, 13th Lothian Regiment Royal Scots, formerly Private 1609, 16th West Yorkshire Regiment, died 22/8/1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

DOWNS Gilbert Hemsworth, Private 30755, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment died 9/5/1918 aged 20. He is at rest in Esquelbecq Military Cemetery, France.

EARNSHAW Albert, Private, Signaller, 67051, 10th Sherwood Foresters died 22/2/1917 aged 21. He is at rest in Boulogne Easter Cemetery, France.

ESPLEY Samuel, Bombardier (M.M.) 21431, b Battery, 78th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died 5/10/1917. He is at rest in Cement House Cemetery, Belgium.

EXLEY Albert Edward, Private 59962, 1/4th Territorial Northumberland Fusiliers. Born at Queensbury enlisted at Bradford both in Yorkshire, died 22/3/1918. He is at rest in Roisel Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.

FAICHNEY Harry William, Private 34004, 2nd York and Lancaster Regiment died 1/12/1917 aged 25. He is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France.

FARNISH John Darnley, Private 202963, 1/4th King's own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 25/7/1917 aged 37. He is at rest in Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport, France.

FARNISH Leonard, Private 241648, 1/6th West Yorkshire Regiment died 3/9/1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.

FAWCETT Edward Bertram, Captain, 92nd Punjabis died 21/4/1916 aged 32. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq. He was mentioned in Despatches.

FLETCHER Horace, Lance Corporal 13826 Born at Idle died 20/6/1918 aged 23. He is at rest in Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.

GALLOWAY Richard, Private 50965, B Company, 11th East Yorkshire Regiment died 13/8/1918 aged 29. He is at rest in Me Grand Hasard Military Cemetery, Morbecque, France .

GIBSON Norman, Private 15/1311, D Coy, 15th West Yorkshire Regiment died 22/4/1918, aged 21. He is at rest in Le Grand Hasard Military Cemetery, Morbecque, France.

GOODAIRE Horace, Sergeant 21/2, 1st West Yorkshire Regiment died 14/7/1918. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot memorial, Belgium,

GOODALL Fred, Private 418547, 11th West Yorkshire Regiment died 9/7/1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.

GOODALL Percy, Private 35445, 2nd West Riding Regiment, formerly 58875, Northumberland Fusiliers Born at Liversedge, lived at Heckmondwike and enlisted at Bradford, all in Yorkshire. He died 25/10/1918 aged 19. He is at rest in Verchain British Cemetery, Vershain-Maugre, France.

HALL George Fewster, Private 242835, 1/5th York and Lancaster Regiment died 26/7/1917 aged 33. He is at rest in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.

HARRISON (alias surname) Fred, Lance Corporal 6492, 1st Loyal North Lancashire Regiment died 30/4/1915 aged 37. He is at rest in Tinglev Churchyard, Denmark. True family name "HOLDSWORTH"

HARRISON Walter (It may be this person) Private 38599, 8th Service Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment died 17/6/1918 aged 35. He is at rest in Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension, Italy

HARRISON William A Private 61206, 18th Yorkshire Regiment died 25/11/1918. He is commemorated on a Special memorial St Paul's churchyard, Shipley, Yorkshire.

HOLLAND Gordon Stanley, Acting Sergeant 16144, 10th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 16/9/91916 aged 21. He is at rest in Dartmoor Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, Somme, France.

HINDLE Percival Urban, Corporal 267936, 6th Black Watch, died 23/4/1917. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

INGLE Percy, Gunner 95867, B Battery, 46th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died 25/9/1915. He is at rest in White House Cemetery, St. Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium.

JACQUES Harry, Private 240986, 5th Yorkshire Regiment died 27/3/1917 He is at rest in Heath Cemetery, Harbonniers, Somme, France (CWGC have JAQUES)

JOYCE John, Private 41984, 12th Manchester Regiment died 25/4/1917 aged 24. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

KIPLING Herbert, Private 62466, 5th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 27/8/1918. He is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.

KNOWLES Jonathan Edward, Captain 4th Middlesex Regiment died 23/8/1914 aged 32. He was the son of Edward Sugden Knowles and Frances Mary Knowles, of Rawdon, Leeds husband of Viva Brabazon Knowles, of Whitehill Chase, Bordon, Hants. Served in the South African War. One of the first British officer battle casualties of the war (originally buried in Maisieres Communal Cemetery) He is now at rest in Cement House Cemetery, Belgium.

LEACH David, Gunner 790202, Royal Field Artillery, Base Details, France, died 4/9/1918. He is at rest in the Upper Chapel Congregation Cemetery, Idle, Yorkshire.

LEE Wilfred (It may be this person) Private 16/493, West Yorkshire Regiment Born at Rawdon Yorkshire and died 2/10/1918. He is at rest in Le Quesnoy Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

LINDLEY Harold, Private 28141, 4th Grenadier Guards died 13/4/1918 aged 19. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

LLOYD Cecil (It may be this person) Corporal 17860, Cecil Berry LLOYD, B Company, 10th West Riding Regiment. He died in War Hospital, Bradford at 21.10 hours on the 18th April 1919 of Pyemia (Blood poisoning, septicemia) from a bayonet wound received in action. He was buried with full military honours at 3 pm on Wednesday 24th April 1919 at Undercliffe Cemetery, Bradford. He was the son of Arthur Berry and Mary Jane of 257, Otley Road, Bradford.

LODGE Hiram, Private 117972, 306th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery killed in action in France 13th November 1917. Prior to enlistment he was the publican of the Dog and Gun, Apperley Bridge and was the husband of Annie nee Hutchinson same address. He is at rest in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.

LONG Arthur Hopwood, Private 50885, 10th Cheshire Regiment died 7/6/1917 aged 22. He is at rest in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, Belgium.

MANN John Nelson, Private 241571, 2/5th West Riding Regiment died 20/11/1917. He is commemorated on the Cambrai memorial, Louverval, France .

MASTERS Arthur (Unable to find the correct record for this person listed with the CWGC)

METCALFE Harry, (It may be this person) Private 204303, 1/7th West Riding Regiment died 8/10/1917. He is at rest in Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Belgium.

MILNER John Barker, Private 242852, 2/4th West Riding Regiment died 15/10/1918 aged 42. He is at rest in Bois-Guillaume Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

NELSON Edward, Private G/29741, 7th Royal West Surrey Regiment, formerly 317696 Royal Army Service Corps. Born at Apperley Bridge, Yorkshire. He is at rest in Dive Copse British Cemetery, Sailly-Le-Sec, Somme, France.

NELSON Herbert Harold, Private 32872, 10th Yorkshire Regiment died 4/10/1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

PATRICK Horatio, Private 19816, 10th West Yorkshire Regiment, died 5/7/1916 aged 26. He is at rest in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

PEACOCK Walter Ernest, Gunner 21489, Royal Field Artillery. Native of Idle, Yorkshire and died of wounds 27/8/1915 aged 19. He is at rest in Ypres reservoir Cemetery, Belgium.

PRIESTLEY Laurence (Unable to find the correct record for this person listed with the CWGC)

PROSSER James Henry, Lance Corporal 306674, 2/7th West Riding Regiment died 13/4/1918 aged 29. He is at rest in Bienvillers Military Cemetery, France.

WILSON Herbert Alexander (Memorial has Herbert), Private 42616, 8th Royal Fusiliers died 9/4/1917 aged 41. Born at Greengates and lived at Shipley. He is at rest in Gourock Trench Cemetery, Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines, France.

RHODES Albert, Private 174381, 16th Canadian Machine Gun Corps died 31/10/1017 aged 36. he is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium.

RHODES Charles, Private 1447 1st West Yorkshire Regiment, transferred to as Private 477309, 938th Area Employment Coy, Labour Corps, died 31/5/1918 aged 34. He is at rest in Etaples Military Cemetery, France.

RHODES William Arthur (Only one William A listed with the CWGC for WW1) Private 3574 William Arthur, 10th Lancashire Fusiliers, died 10/2/1917 aged 21. He was the son of Fred and Sarah of 16, George Street, Abbey Hey, Gorton, Manchester. He is at rest in Serre Road Cemetery, No 2, Somme, France.

ROBINSON Ernest, Private 14837, C Company, 2nd West Riding Regiment died 28/5/1918 aged 38. He is at rest in Gonnehem British Cemetery, France.

ROBINSON Walter (Unable to find the correct record for this person listed with the CWGC)

ROO James Walter, Corporal 12129, 10th Yorkshire Regiment died 25/10/1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

ROO Richard, Private 203432, 10th Lincolnshire Regiment, formerly 4171 West Riding Regiment died 22/7/1918 aged 32. He is at rest in Cologne Southern Cemetery, Germany.

SEAGE William Samuel, Private 19815, 10th West Yorkshire Regiment. Born at Buckfastleigh, Devon enlisted at Bradford and died 1/7/1916 . He is at rest in Fricourt New Military Cemetery, Somm, France.

SHACKLETON Arnold, Private 3/10824, 8th West Riding Regiment died 28/8/1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

SHUTTLEWORTH Gershom, Gunner 42169, 39th Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died 15/8/1915 aged 23. He was the son of Benjamin and Lucy Ann of 275, Davisville Avenue, Toronto, Canada. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium.

SMITH Clifford (It may be this person) Private 29440, 8th Border Regiment died 27/1/1919 aged 19. He was the son of William and Ann of 4, Crowther Avenue, Calverley, Leeds. He is at rest in Idle Upper Congregation Chapel Cemetery, Yorkshire

SMITH Percy Valentine. Corporal 14517, 9th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 2/9/1915 aged 19. He was the son of James and Sarah Mary who in 1911 was living as Percy Valentine with his parents at 51, Bank, Eccleshill Road, Bradford, Yorkshire. He was at that time employed as a solicitors office clerk. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France

SPENCE Walter Ernest (Memorial has Walter) Private 40515, 10th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 6/10/1918 aged 27. He is at rest in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery Epehy , Somme, France

SKEVINGTON Arthur Victor, 2nd Lieutenant 13th attached to the 10th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 25/9/1916 aged 19. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.

STANSFIELD Allen Firth (Memorial has Allan) Private 15/1842, 15th West Yorkshire Regiment died 1/7/1916 aged 22. He is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, Somme, France.

STEELE Arthur,Private122251, 8th Machine Gun Corps died 2/3/1918. He is at rest in Oxford Road Cemetery, Belgium.

STEVENS Albert, Private 39364, 2/4th King's own Yorkshire Light Infantry died 18/4/1918 aged 40. He is at rest in Bienvillers Military Cemetery, France. (He was the husband of Mary and father of Harry who also fell).

STEVENS Harry, Private 220665, 1st Royal Berkshire Regiment, formerly 176308 Hertfordshire Yeomanry, Born at Yeadon and Lived at Apperley Bridge, both Yorkshire and died 24/10/1918 He was the son Mary and Private Albert who also fell).

SYKES Alfred, Private 7654, 1st East Yorkshire Regiment died 18/10/1914 aged 30. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.

SYKES Norman, Private 242528, 1/5th West Riding Regiment. Born at Bradford and lived at Greengates, Yorkshire. He died 7/8/1917. He is at rest in Ramscappelle Road Military Cemetery, Belgium.

WALTON Ward, Gunner 796083 B, Battery, 186th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died 17/9/1917. He is at rest in Voormezeele Enclosure Number 1 and Number 2, Belgium.

WARD Fred, Private 235046, 10th West Yorkshire Regiment died 25/5/1917 aged 27. He is at rest in Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France.

WATERWORTH George, Private 11510, 7th York and Lancaster Regiment died 25/3/1918 aged 36. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France

WATERWORTH Whitham Laycock , Private 20458, 12th Northumberland Fusiliers died 13/4/1917. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

WATERWORTH Percy, Private 36485, 9th Northumberland Fusiliers (Northumberland Hussars) died 1/11/1918 aged 29. He is at rest in Villers-Pol Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

WHITEHEAD John Walton, Captain , B Battery, 246th West Riding Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died 1/12/1917 aged 28. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium

WHITEHEAD Jasper MacIntyre (Memorial has Jasper) Private 92287, 3rd London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers died 19/9/1918 aged 19. He is at rest in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery, Epehy, Somme, France.

Little time for local stuff at this time of year but one I wanted to catch before the nights draw in was the remaining fragment of the Apperley Bridge railway station service 948. Originally operated all day by TLC but lost with other work and included in the Wharfedale links banner, it is now operated by Transdev Keighley. Consisting of only 3 journeys each peak to take commuters back to the Eccleshill area of Bradford, 713 is seen on the station approach road operating the final trip that day in early August. A specially constructed bus shelter and turning circle is provided at the station but now with only a bare bones bus service it looks rather generous for current purpose.

Photographed on the upper floor textile machinery section of the Bradford Industrial Museum.

The museum was originally built as a worsted spinning mill in 1875, then in more modern times was bought by Bradford Council in 2000 and opened as a museum in 2004.

Oscar, one of the local cats fighting in my garden. He lost a lot of fur, but he won! (taken through the window so not the greatest of quality)

The 750 seat purpose-built Oxford Cinema on Dudley Hill Road was of a stone construction, and opened in 1914. Sound was installed by 1930 and it closed briefly again in 1955 for refurbishment. In 1962 it became a bingo club for three days of the week and a cinema the rest. It closed temporarily for alterations in 1965 but closed permanently as a cinema early the next year reopening as a bingo club, now the Oxford Bingo and Social Club.

Another of the more 'modern' bodied trolleys - No.831 about to carry out the same turn at Bolton Junction. 8/8/70.

TLC Travel 14853, an ADL Enviro 200 bodied E20D, is seen here on Windhill Old Road, Thackley while passing under a former railway bridge.

This bridge used to carry the Great Northern Railway's Shipley branch line which curved through Thackley, Idle and Eccleshill to Laisterdyke. The line opened in 1874 and closed to passengers in 1932 and for freight in 1968. Most of this line has now been built on although much of the line between Windhill and Thackley is still in place albeit minus any tracks.

Bradford Trolley 834 (1962 rebodied) turning right at Bolton Junct. crossroads. 8/8/70.

The 8th.August 1970 dawned very sunny but hazy. Here is a morning shot of Roe bodied (1949) No.745 on Route 40 on the Bolton Road near Eccleshill.

1959 bodied Trolleys Nos. 790 & 791 pass each other at Bolton Junction on Route 42. 8/8/70.

Lightning lights up the clouds

Eccleshill United of NCEL1 host NPL side Shaw Lane in a pre-season friendly at Plumpton Park. July 7th 2017.

This image shows Shaw Lane in the pre-match warm-up.

The Windhill line was the original railway route between Shipley and Bradford. Opened in the mid 1870s, it carried passenger and goods services over a roughly clockwise 6.5 mile journey from Shipley Windhill station, to Laisterdyke ,where it joined with the LYR corridor into Bradford Exchange. The line left Windhill along a n inclined hillside embankment before turning south, through suburban stops at Thackley, Idle and Eccleshill . Several cuttings and a couple of short tunnels were included along the way in addition to the unrelenting 1 in 50 climb out of Shipley.

The line sadly didn't last as long as hoped. Shortfall in passenger use saw the intermediate stations close in 1931 and the line reduced to single track although Laisterdyke station which also serving trains between Leeds - Bradford & Manchester on the LYR route remained open until the 1950s.

Goods operations lasted for almost four decades further before the Windhill line was shut altogether in 1968 and eventually lifted. After Shipley Windhill shut, the line itself was connected to the town's central station on the Midland Railway Airedale route, serving Bradford Forster Square from Skipton and Ilkley.

The line today is used as an unofficial path route between Shipley and Thackley and cycleway /public path between Idle and Eccleshill. Remains of Thackley station still survive in a cutting alongside Leeds Rd, including the brick wall of the stairway to the Shipley bound platform. Shipley Windhill station building remains in use as a business office , with the remains of the connecting spur from the current Shipley line discernible.

First Bradford are now down to half a dozen Wrights Gemini vehicles in the old livery. 37735 is one of the newer batch which assist older sisters on a wide range of routes across Bradford. Some parts of the city haven't changed in years and still hold in their own way a history & charm which has its roots in an age long gone of mills, woollen industry, and machinery. This is Eccleshill village to the North of the city. The wall to the left of the bus is where once stood a 19th century lock-up and a public urinal, however these have been walled up for some considerable time. The lock-up and urinal are over-topped by a section of stone paved walkway with railings known as, The Monkey Bridge, overlooking a small triangular area of land at the road junction that was the site of the village stocks.

The Windhill line was the original railway route between Shipley and Bradford. Opened in the mid 1870s, it carried passenger and goods services over a roughly clockwise 6.5 mile journey from Shipley Windhill station, to Laisterdyke ,where it joined with the LYR corridor into Bradford Exchange. The line left Windhill along a n inclined hillside embankment before turning south, through suburban stops at Thackley, Idle and Eccleshill . Several cuttings and a couple of short tunnels were included along the way in addition to the unrelenting 1 in 50 climb out of Shipley.

The line sadly didn't last as long as hoped. Shortfall in passenger use saw the intermediate stations close in 1931 and the line reduced to single track although Laisterdyke station which also serving trains between Leeds - Bradford & Manchester on the LYR route remained open until the 1950s.

Goods operations lasted for almost four decades further before the Windhill line was shut altogether in 1968 and eventually lifted. After Shipley Windhill shut, the line itself was connected to the town's central station on the Midland Railway Airedale route, serving Bradford Forster Square from Skipton and Ilkley.

The line today is used as an unofficial path route between Shipley and Thackley and cycleway /public path between Idle and Eccleshill. Remains of Thackley station still survive in a cutting alongside Leeds Rd, including the brick wall of the stairway to the Shipley bound platform. Shipley Windhill station building remains in use as a business office , with the remains of the connecting spur from the current Shipley line discernible.

The Windhill line was the original railway route between Shipley and Bradford. Opened in the mid 1870s, it carried passenger and goods services over a roughly clockwise 6.5 mile journey from Shipley Windhill station, to Laisterdyke ,where it joined with the LYR corridor into Bradford Exchange. The line left Windhill along a n inclined hillside embankment before turning south, through suburban stops at Thackley, Idle and Eccleshill . Several cuttings and a couple of short tunnels were included along the way in addition to the unrelenting 1 in 50 climb out of Shipley.

The line sadly didn't last as long as hoped. Shortfall in passenger use saw the intermediate stations close in 1931 and the line reduced to single track although Laisterdyke station which also serving trains between Leeds - Bradford & Manchester on the LYR route remained open until the 1950s.

Goods operations lasted for almost four decades further before the Windhill line was shut altogether in 1968 and eventually lifted. After Shipley Windhill shut, the line itself was connected to the town's central station on the Midland Railway Airedale route, serving Bradford Forster Square from Skipton and Ilkley.

The line today is used as an unofficial path route between Shipley and Thackley and cycleway /public path between Idle and Eccleshill. Remains of Thackley station still survive in a cutting alongside Leeds Rd, including the brick wall of the stairway to the Shipley bound platform. Shipley Windhill station building remains in use as a business office , with the remains of the connecting spur from the current Shipley line discernible.

In friends' garden in Eccleshill, Bradford. I helped to dig this little feller in three years ago, so it's good to see it deveoping well.

The Windhill line was the original railway route between Shipley and Bradford. Opened in the mid 1870s, it carried passenger and goods services over a roughly clockwise 6.5 mile journey from Shipley Windhill station, to Laisterdyke ,where it joined with the LYR corridor into Bradford Exchange. The line left Windhill along a n inclined hillside embankment before turning south, through suburban stops at Thackley, Idle and Eccleshill . Several cuttings and a couple of short tunnels were included along the way in addition to the unrelenting 1 in 50 climb out of Shipley.

The line sadly didn't last as long as hoped. Shortfall in passenger use saw the intermediate stations close in 1931 and the line reduced to single track although Laisterdyke station which also serving trains between Leeds - Bradford & Manchester on the LYR route remained open until the 1950s.

Goods operations lasted for almost four decades further before the Windhill line was shut altogether in 1968 and eventually lifted. After Shipley Windhill shut, the line itself was connected to the town's central station on the Midland Railway Airedale route, serving Bradford Forster Square from Skipton and Ilkley.

The line today is used as an unofficial path route between Shipley and Thackley and cycleway /public path between Idle and Eccleshill. Remains of Thackley station still survive in a cutting alongside Leeds Rd, including the brick wall of the stairway to the Shipley bound platform. Shipley Windhill station building remains in use as a business office , with the remains of the connecting spur from the current Shipley line discernible.

The PD3 was the final variant of the Leyland Titan, being the 30ft long version of the PD2 model, introduced in 1956 when double deckers of that length on 2 axles were first permitted. In usual Leyland practice, the chassis type code indicated the particular combination of specification, the PD3A/12 featuring the Leyland 0.600 engine, air brakes, pneumocyclic gearbox and a concealed radiator.

By the late 1960`s the rear engined bus had become very popular because of the ease with which it would accept bodywork capable of one person operation and thereby also attracting government grants. The grants were largely aimed at persuading operators to modernise their fleets and naturally most operators took advantage of the scheme. The result of this trend was a decline in the demand for traditional front engined chassis, and fewer and fewer were ordered. In 1969 the last of a long line of Leyland Titans was produced.

In the 1950`s and up to 1964, Bradford had sourced its double deckers from AEC. The 1966 deliveries were Daimler CVG6s but in 1967 Bradford strangely ordered its first PD3s at the same time as taking its first rear engined double deckers, which comprised both Leyland Atlanteans and Daimler Fleetlines. These two models again featured in 1968 deliveries but for the 1969 double deck intake, PD3s were again specified, the batch comprising 15 buses numbered 301 - 315, These were among the last PD3s delivered, being concurrent with a batch for Stockport, an export order for India, and two (including the very last) for Ramsbottom.

When new in April 1969, 309 was allocated to Bankfoot depot and ran on the Manchester Road and City Circle routes. On formation of the West Yorkshire PTE it was renumbered 2309 and later transferred to the Hall Ings (Interchange) depot on its opening in 1977. It continued in service with the PTE until May 1984 and passed immediately on withdrawal to the West Yorkshire Transport Museum, where it was restored to original condition and livery. It was acquired by Keighley Bus Museum from the administrators of Transperience in September 1998 with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Science Museum PRISM Fund and Bradford Metropolitan Borough SNL801.

Bradford had acquired earlier batches of Regent V all with Metro Cammell bodies, in small numbers in 1959 (15), 1961 (5) and 1962 (10) and in larger numbers for trolleybus replacement in 1963 (60) and 1964 (30), these buses being numbered 106-225, a total of 120 buses. This period saw the closure of trolleybus routes to Bradford Moor (1962), Crossflatts (1963). Bolton - Bankfoot (1964) and Eccleshill (1964). Bradford first motorbuses in 1926 had been AEC's and Regent IIIs and Vs were bought regularly between 1947 & 1964.

By the late 1950s a move was being made away from the traditional rear entrance open platform for two major reasons. The most important of these was safety. Later the entrance began to appear at the front of the vehicle so that the driver could supervise the platform. The addition of doors also meant that the bus was warmer and at a time was car ownership was beginning to grow. this was considered an important element in the fight to retain passengers.

6220 KW is representative of the Bradford fleet of the early 1960s as by this time about a third of the fleet was of this type. The vehicle was still in service at the formation of the West Yorkshire PTE in 1974, and received fleet number 2220 as a Bradford District vehicle. Due to the increasing difficulty of obtaining spares for AEC vehicles after the company's closure, many of these buses were withdrawn before the end of their expected lives and scrapped in the early 1970s. 2220, however, was retained for use as a mobile mess room for the bus station painting crew and remained in use even after the engine had ceased to function, being towed to site as necessary.

The bus was purchased by the West Yorkshire Transport Museum in 1985 and restored to original condition. It was acquired by Keighley Bus Museum from the administrators of Transperience in September 1998 with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Science Museum PRISM Fund and Bradford Metropolitan Borough Council.

6220 KW: AEC Regent V MetroCammell H40/30F 1964

During the early 1960s, trolleybus operators throughout the country were looking at running costs and deciding that trolleybus operation was becoming too expensive. Routes and systems were gradually closed as opportunity arose and replacement motorbuses were purchased. Bradford in the early 1960s was in the throes of redevelopment and a decision was taken that certain trolleybus routes should be abandoned.

The idea of building a church at Eccleshill seems to have come from Rev'd William Scoresby (Vicar of Bradford and Arctic Explorer), who planned it and the school in the 1840's as part of his effort to 'help the poor of Eccleshill'. The site of the church building was originally part of a meadow known as Shoulder Broad, adjoining the Dudley Hill and Killinghall Turnpike Road, and running alongside Harrogate Road. A corner of the meadow was given by George Baron, of South Cave, near Hull. The churchyard was consecrated on 7th February 1842, and the school building also dates from this year. The church building was consecrated on 28th March 1848 - both ceremonies conducted by the Bishop of Ripon.

Dedicated to St Luke, the new church was designed by Walker Rawstorne in what was described as "the Perpendicular Gothic style of the 14th Century". Its steeple, furnished with lantern and spire, formed what was considered to be "a pleasing feature of the landscape." The cost was £2,650 and the building was "calculated to hold 820 persons". (For a photograph of the building in 1948, showing the original steeple, please see below.)

The new church building had a gallery on each side as well as one at the west end. The font stood by the west door on the building's north side, and there was a small sanctuary (not the present chancel). The windows were of plain glass, and the high straight-backed pews were painted green. There was a stove for heating, and gas lighting. There was originally no organ.

When the church was erected the public house opposite with its four bow windows (a former coaching station) changed its name to the "Ring of Bells" - in spite of the fact that the new church had no bells! (Its former name was the "Hammer and Anvil" because of its proximity to the blacksmith's shop opposite in Harrogate Road, and its former name is remembered in a window at the side of the main entrance, which shows a hammer and an anvil.)

The new parish of St Luke Eccleshill was officially constituted by Order in Council in 1858. The Rev'd Edward Mercer, a native of the Isle of Man, became the first Vicar. He stayed until 1890.

On Easter Day (31st March) 1861, pew rents were abolished and St Luke's was declared "free and open for all comers".

The first organ was installed in 1862 on the north side of the building.

Although the Centenary Book (see footnote) says "a large renovation scheme was carried out, including the building of a new chancel with choir and clergy vestries and organ chamber. ", it is difficult to avoid the impression from the two photographs that the East Window of 1874 and the wall in which it is placed were retained unchanged in the new chancel and therefore that the chancel was not "new" so much as modified at the sides. We would be grateful for any clarification of this point.

The present east window dates from 1874, and is a memorial to Col. George Stott-Stanhope, who resided at Eccleshill Hall (where Hutton Middle School later stood) after he had retired from service in Madras. Subsequently he built a larger house: "The Park" in Ravenscliffe Wood.

During the last years of Mr Mercer's long ministry the north and south galleries were removed, an improvement in that much more light entered the building. The original pews, which must have been extremely uncomfortable, were replaced by "more commodious seats of pitch-pine", and wooden floors were laid. These alterations cost £400, and the building was re-opened on 15th September 1887. The preacher, the Vicar of Leeds, afterwards became Bishop of Chester.

Mr Mercer died on his 70th birthday on 18th December 1890, and his ashes were interred in the churchyard. Four years later, under the next Vicar, Thomas Gleave, the organ was replaced by the present instrument (although it has been enlarged twice since), which then stood in the north side of the building. Stained glass windows were added in 1904.

The present chancel was added to the building in 1912, incorporating the east window of 1874. The organ was moved to a chamber on the south side of the chancel, and was reconstructed and enlarged. The oak reredos (woodwork on the east wall of the chancel) and communion table were presented in 1914, probably because the floor levels had been raised and the reredos was necessary to restore the appearance of the chancel. (A complete picture of the Last Supper in the window is now hidden behind the reredos.) Also in 1914 the choir stalls were installed. The chair in the sanctuary, traditionally used by the bishop at confirmation services, commemorates Emily West and dates to 1917.

In 1918 the stone font was moved from its original location in the north-west corner of the church (where the kitchen is now) to a position in the centre of the porch (which thus became a baptistery). Also in 1918 a clock was installed in the tower as a memorial to those who had died in the First World War.

The lych-gate over the entrance from Harrogate Road commemorates the dead of the Second World War (1939-45). In commemoration of the centenary of the church's opening, the organ was rebuilt and enlarged in 1948. A centenary booklet (see below) was also produced, which contains many photographs of church people of this time, and also a few photographs of the building, which are reproduced on this page.

Perhaps the biggest change to the church building took place in 1961, when, because of structural weakness and poor foundations, the tower had to be demolished. Movement had taken place, and the addition of iron strapping failed to halt the deterioration. The present open-work tower was completed in 1975, designed by Ernest Fairs (still a member of the congregation). The coat of arms of coloured fibreglass were made in Eccleshill and are those of St Luke and the Diocese of Bradford. At the same time modern toilets were added in the north-west corner of the building. The organ was also overhauled in 1971.

In 1984 it was decided to construct a "narthex" (an internal room) under the remaining gallery at the back of the nave. This was for two reasons: that the building could be better used during the week, and that the church should have a room of its own which could be used if the school building was unavailable. The narthex is divided from the worship area by a sliding folding screen which can be opened when necessary, and it can be heated separately. A small kitchen was also added.

The church building was fitted with new carpets in the 1990's, and the choir vestry was refurbished, making it available for small meetings and services. Since then the church has made various improvements to allow greater access: a ramp for wheelchairs and pushchairs, accessible toilet for wheelchair users, handrails for the chancel steps, amplification and a hearing loop for those hard of hearing, refurbishment (completed in 1998, new "Common Worship" service booklets in large print (14 point), service and hymn books in Braille, the use of Makaton sign language in action songs, . . In these ways there has been a real effort to make the building and worship both attractive and useful to those who seek God.


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