Battle of Soissons, 486

Battle of Soissons, 486

Battle of Soissons, 486

The battle of Soissons (486 AD) was the first recorded victory won by Clovis I, king of the Franks, and saw him defeat Syagrius, the ruler of the last Roman enclave in northern Gaul.

When Clovis came to the throne in 481 AD he inherited a small kingdom based in Flanders. To his west was a significant area of Roman territory, left behind by the collapse of Roman power in the west. This area had been ruled by Syagrius since 465 AD, at first as the chief Roman official in the area. After the removal of the last Roman emperor in the west Syagrius held on to power, and ruled what was effectively a Gallo-Roman kingdom with the aid of the local bishops.

Clovis didn't move against Syagrius for five years. Gregory of Tours, our main source for these events, gives us a very brief account of the actual fighting. Clovis demanded that Syagrius meet him in battle. Syagrius, who was confident in his ability to defeat the Franks, offered battle but his army was crushed. The defeated general escaped from the battlefield and was able to reach King Alaric II, the Visigothic king of Toulouse. Clovis demanded the return of his enemy, and Alaric handed him over (Gregory doesn't give a timeframe for these events, so they may have happened immediately after the battle or several years later. Syagrius was held captive until Clovis completed the conquest of his kingdom and was then executed. Again we don't know how long this conquest took, although there are some hints that Paris may have resisted his first attacks.

Throughout his military career Clovis preferred to fight with allies. During the campaign against Syagrius he called upon his fellow Frankish kings for aid. Two are recorded as responding, both relatives of Clovis - Ragnachar, king at Cambrai and Chararic.

Chararic brought his army to the campaign, but didn’t take part in the final battle, preferring to wait at a distance and support the winner. Unsurprisingly Clovis was furious and at some point after the battle he captured Chararic and his son. At first Clovis was happy to force them into the priesthood, potentially eliminating them as rivals. Only after Chararic's son hinted that he was only biding his time and would soon turn on Clovis were they both executed. Clovis seized their kingdom.

Ragnachar actually took part in the battle, but this didn't preserve him from betrayal. Clovis bribed some of Ragnachar's supporters and they in turn invited Clovis to attack Ragnachar. Ragnachar was defeated in battle and executed by Clovis, who seized his kingdom. The bribes had been paid in gold armlets and belts, but after the battle the traitors discovered that these were only gold plated.

Gregory of Tours includes a story about the aftermath of the conquest. Clovis had not yet converted to Christianity, and his army plundered a number of churches. From one they took a large and beautiful vase. The bishop of that church sent messengers to Clovis asking if that particular vase could be returned, even if the other items were lost. At this date the Franks had not had kings for very long, and the young Clovis was restricted by a number of traditions. One was that the items from any plunder were to be divided by lot. During the meeting to divide up the treasure Clovis asked if he could have the vase as well as his normal share. Most of his men grovelled rather abjectly, but one young warrior disagreed with this attempt to break from tradition, and broke the vase with his axe. Clovis kept quiet, but a year later, at a review of his men, he insulted this warrior's appearance, seized his axe and threw it to the ground. When the young man leant down to pick up his axe Clovis drove his own axe into the man's head, saying 'This is what you did at Soissons to the vase'. Gregory includes this story partly to demonstrate Clovis' ruthlessness and partly to show the respect he already had for the church even when still a pagan.

As well as expanding his borders, this victory gave Clovis several new neighbours, most importantly the Visigoths in the south, and the Alemanni and Burgundians in the south-east. These contacts would soon lead to further wars and with them further expansion.


Battle of Soissons (486)


The Battle of Soissons was fought in 486 between Frankish forces under Clovis I and the Gallo-Roman domain of Soissons under Syagrius. The battle was a victory for the Franks, and led to the conquest of the Roman rump state of Soissons, a milestone for the Franks in their attempt to establish themselves as a major regional power.

In the final collapse of the Western Roman Empire between 476 and 480, Syagrius was the only remaining representative of Roman rule in the area between the Loire and the Somme. Syagrius was the son of Aegidius, Ώ] the last Roman magister militum per Gallias he preserved his father's rump state, the Domain of Soissons, between the Somme and the Loire, calling himself dux.

The central location of Soissons in northern Gaul and its largely intact infrastructure allowed a level of stability in the years of the Migration Period, but also made the area tempting for their Frankish neighbours to the north-east. The realm of Syagrius was of almost the same size as the Frankish area, though the Franks were divided into small kingdoms, and, on the right bank of the Rhine, little touched by Roman culture.

Nevertheless, Clovis I managed to assemble enough Franks to confront Syagrius's forces. Clovis issued a challenge to Syagrius naming the time and place of the battle. ΐ] Gregory of Tours mentions that one Chararic had brought his forces to the battlefield but then stood aloof, hoping to ally with the winner. Α] Gregory of Tours. History of the Franks book 2 chapter 41. http://www.northvegr.org/lore/frank/021.php</ref>

The ensuing battle was a decisive victory for Clovis and his Franks. Syagrius fled to the Visigoths (under Alaric II), but Clovis threatened war and the Visigoths handed Syagrius over for execution.

Consequently the realm of the Franks almost doubled in size its border was now on the Loire adjacent to the realm of the Visigoths, who were finally routed at the Battle of Vouillé in 507 and forced to retreat south of the Pyrenées.

In due course Clovis marched against Chararic, captured him and his sons, and forced them to accept ordination and tonsures as deacons. On report of their hope to regain power, he had them executed. Α]


Battle of Soissons

The Battle of Soissons can refer to one of several important historical battles, all of which took place in the vicinity of the French town Soissons:

    – A battle between the Franks, under Clovis I, and the Western Roman Empire, under Syagrius – A battle between the Neustrians, under Chilperic II and Ragenfrid, with the Aquitainians, under Odo the Great, against the Austrasians, under Charles Martel, who won. – A battle during which King Robert I of France was killed, possibly by Charles III, and the latter was defeated and imprisoned by Rudolph, Duke of Burgundy who succeeded Robert I as French monarch. – A Napoleonic Wars battle. – A World War I battle, waged from July 18–22, 1918, between American and German troops, resulting in over 12,000 casualties for the former.

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article


Battle of Soissons, 486 - History

One group of barbarians that poured into the old Western Roman Empire were the Franks. Not much is known about the early history of this group or exactly where they came from, but the Franks would play a big part in shaping the history of Western Europe during the early Middle Ages.

The Franks settled in old Roman Gaul. One of the earliest records of the Franks was at the Battle of Chalons in AD 451, where Roman General Aetius defeated his boyhood friend, Attila the Hun. Fighting on the side of the Romans where the Visigoths and the Franks. One Frank on the battlefield was Merovich. The Franks were separated into many tribes, each with their own king. Merovich was the king of the Salian tribe of Franks. Merovich took on mythical status legend said that his father was Poseidon, the sea god. Salian means "people of the sea." The Salian Franks lived close to the sea and were excellent sailors. Perhaps this is why Merovich became associated with Poseidon. Whether or not that was the case, the Franks had not converted to Christianity, rather they believed in many gods and goddesses. Merovich was the founder of a dynasty of the Salian Franks known as the Merovingian Dynasty.

The Merovingians had a tradition of lifting their leader over their heads on a shield to proclaim him king. The Merovingian kings were known as the long-haired kings, because the king, including Merovich, never cut his hair. The cutting of the king's hair would be a sign that he had lost power and would have to step down as king of the Salian Franks.

Perhaps most important ruler of the early Middle Ages was Merovich's grandson, Clovis. Clovis came to the throne of the Salian Franks at the age of 15. Clovis was a capable but ruthless ruler. He would send invitations to his relatives to join him, claiming he was lonely. If they arrived, Clovis had them killed. Nothing would stand in his way of total power, and relatives were seen as a threat. Clovis defeated Syagrius, the last Roman governor in Gaul, at the Battle of Soissons in AD 486. This marked the total end of any Roman rule in the Old Western Roman Empire.

The Frankish kings allowed their soldiers to loot and plunder after a battle. The Frankish warriors would bring their plunder to a spot designated by the king, where the plunder would be divided among the king and his warriors. One of the favorite places to loot was a Roman Catholic church, which always had gold and valuable items. Since the Franks were not Christian, they cared little about the religious value of these items. After the Battle of Soissons, the Salian Franks stole valuable items from the church at Rheims. Bishop Regimius, the leader of the church at Rheims, was heartbroken, because the Franks stole a vase that was very special to the bishop and his parish. Bishop Regimius sent a messenger to King Clovis. The messenger begged the king to return the vase to the church. Clovis, having pity for the messenger, and admiring his courage, told him to have the bishop meet the Frankish warriors at Soissons, where they would divide the plunder. If his warriors would allow Clovis to have the vase as part of his share, he would give the vase back to the bishop. There is a great story about how the bishop eventually had the vase returned to him at Soissons. The vase was handcrafted, large and beautiful. It has gone down in history as the Vase of Soissons, even though it was stolen from Rheims (See map for locations).

One-by-one, Clovis defeated the other Frankish tribes, so that by AD 509, Clovis was king of all of the Franks. Clovis drove the Visigoths out of Gaul, across the Pyrenees Mountains into Spain. In Spain, the Visigoths established a kingdom with the city of Toledo as its capital.

The events in Clovis' life were captured in a book called the History of the Franks, written by Gregory of Tours (see map below). Clovis is an important figure in the Middle Ages for two reasons: He united the Frankish tribes under one king, creating a Frankish Empire in old Roman Gaul, this would eventually lead to the nation we call France, named after the Franks. Secondly, Clovis was the first barbarian king to convert to the Roman Catholic form of Christianity. By becoming a Roman Catholic, Clovis became an ally of the Pope and a protector of the Roman Catholics. The pope was the bishop of Rome and the spiritual leader of the many Roman Catholics in Western Europe. The Pope was not selected by any king, and you could argue that he was more powerful than the kings of the Early Middle Ages.

Although Clovis was a strong leader, his wife had a dream that his dynasty would become weaker as the generations passed. Clotilda warned her husband that the Merovingians would come in as lions, then change to wolves, and finally end as jackals. In a future online chapter, we will find out if she was correct.


Clovis I and the Vase of Soissons

Drawing, after a fifteenth-century miniature, of Saint Remigius, bishop of Reims, begging Clovis to return the vase.

When Clovis I succeeded his father as King of the Salian Franks in 481, at the age of sixteen, it was perhaps inevitable that he would come into conflict with the only remaining Roman outpost in Gaul, that ruled by Syragius, in the town of Soissons. Although Clovis’ father, Childeric I, had occasionally allied himself with the Roman Syragius, was a matter of little importance to Clovis, who understood even at that young age that conquest was his only means of survival in the barbaric and violent world he inhabited, and it was a mater of simple logic for him to understand that the stability of his domain required that he conquer the Roman outpost

Soissons is Conquered

Although Clovis only possessed about 6,000 or so troops, his warriors were tough and disciplined, and he snuck suddenly through the forest of Ardennes with his men and surprised the equally well trained and significantly larger force belonging to Syragius at Soissons in 486, at the age of twenty-one. His army decimated the ranks of the Roman legion there, forcing Syragius to flee for his life to Toulouse, where he found sanctuary with Alaric II, the Visigoth king.

Clovis thereupon threatened Alaric with war if Syragius was not handed over to him, and Alaric meekly complied. Clovis then imprisoned Syragius until his conquest of Soissons was complete, and then had him quietly executed, hoping in this way to avoid any partisan uprising in his new territory.

The Vase of Soissons

Although Clovis was a Pagan at the time of his conquest of Soissons, he was on friendly terms with the local Catholic episcopate he had received a warm letter of congratulations from the Archbishop of Reims, Saint Remigius upon succeeding to his father’s throne. After his soldiers had plundered Soissons, Clovis sought to have the celebrated vase of Soissons, a sacred artifact of extraordinary beauty and workmanship treasured by the diocese, so that he could restore it himself to the archbishop Remigius.

According to the historian Gregory of Tours, one of Clovis’ soldiers was dissatisfied with the degree to which Clovis had allowed his men to plunder the city after conquering it, whereupon he split the vase with his axe, saying to Clovis “You will get only the share allowed to you by fate.” According to the legend, Clovis took this challenge to his authority calmly, but a year later, when reviewing his troops, he came across this same soldier, rebuked him for the ungainly condition of his weapons, and proceeded to split the man’s skull with his own axe, saying “It was thus that you treated the Soissons vase.”

The Lasting Effect of the Battle of Soissons

The defeat of Syragius at Soissons represents a turning point in European history. Although it was an independent and isolated city, it had been the last possession of Imperial Rome in Gaul, and when it fell to Clovis in 486, the authority of the Roman Empire in what was to become the nation of France fell with it. While it is not a simple matter to declare any one specific date or event to mark the beginning of modern history, the conquest of Soissons by Clovis I certainly had a major impact on the development of Europe into a collection of nation-states in the Middle Ages and beyond, an organizational structure still extant today in the geographic map of the continent.


Battle of Soissons (486)

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

The Battle of Soissons was fought in 486 between Frankish forces under Clovis I and the Gallo-Roman domain of Soissons under Syagrius. The battle was a victory for the Franks, and led to the conquest of the Roman rump state of Soissons, a milestone for the Franks in their attempt to establish themselves as a major regional power.

In the final collapse of the Western Roman Empire between 476 and 480, Syagrius was the only remaining representative of Roman rule in the area between the Loire and the Somme. Syagrius was the son of Aegidius, ΐ] Roman magister militum per Gallias from 457 to 461 he preserved his father's rump state, the Domain of Soissons, between the Somme and the Loire, calling himself dux.

The central location of Soissons in northern Gaul and its largely intact infrastructure allowed a level of stability in the years of the Migration Period, but also made the area tempting for their Frankish neighbours to the north-east. The realm of Syagrius was of almost the same size as the Frankish area, though the Franks were divided into small kingdoms, and, on the right bank of the Rhine, little touched by Roman culture.

Nevertheless, Clovis I managed to assemble enough Franks to confront Syagrius's forces. Clovis issued a challenge to Syagrius naming the time and place of the battle. Α] Gregory of Tours mentions that one Chararic had brought his forces to the battlefield but then stood aloof, hoping to ally with the winner. Β]

The ensuing battle was a decisive victory for Clovis and his Franks. Syagrius fled to the Visigoths (under Alaric II), but Clovis threatened war and the Visigoths handed Syagrius over for execution.

Consequently, the realm of the Franks almost doubled in size its border was now on the Loire adjacent to the realm of the Visigoths, who were finally routed at the Battle of Vouillé in 507 and forced to retreat south of the Pyrenées.

In due course Clovis marched against Chararic, captured him and his sons, and forced them to accept ordination and tonsures as deacons. On report of their hope to regain power, he had them executed. Β]


3. Alaric

Alaric I (Credit: Apic/Getty Images)

One of the most famous barbarian leaders, the Goth King Alaric I rose to power after the death of the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius II in 395 A.D. shattered a fragile peace between Rome and the Goths. When the Western Emperor Flavius Honorius refused to supply Alaric’s forces with land and supplies in 408, Goth forces laid siege to Rome. In the summer of 410, a group of rebellious slaves opened the Salarian Gate, and Alaric’s troops became the first foreign enemy to enter the city in some 800 years. They plundered Rome over three days, but treated its inhabitants humanely. Alaric is thought to have died soon after they left, during a subsequent expedition towards Africa. His descendants, the Visigoths, migrated to Iberia and established their kingdom in what is now Spain.


Dark Age History


As discussed in part two, Syagrius had assumed power in Soissons and probably territory as far as the Seine and possibly beyond with Gallo-Roman and Visigothic help. This situation occurred when Childeric had taken his Federate Frankish army to Noricum at the request of Zeno or Odoacer in around 47 6 . Possibly at this time the Gallo Romans had made a play for power in the West, suggesting that Syagrius himself may have done so. Without the support of Zeno though this fell through and instead Syagrius appealed to the Visigoths for support. The transition of Childeric leaving and Syagrius assuming power may have been a fairly peaceful one agreed amongst the Gallo Romans of northern Gaul. The remaining Franks, still being pagan, were not yet appreciated as politically or militarily strong enough to intervene having been subdued by the Visigoths on the Rhine, and nor were the Britons of far western Armorica since the demise of Riothamus. This choice of the Visigoths may seem strange when we consider that Sidonius and through him Gregory had painted a picture of Euric as a persecutor of Catholics in south-western Gaul in the 470's. We have seen though that the embassy to Zeno by the Romano Gallic party must have been before 485 when Odoacer and Zeno fell out. This leaves a predicament. The Gallo Romans were unlikely to choose the Visigoths as bed partners if they were currently persecuting Catholic bishops. Euric's initial persecutions must have been over by then and this would make sense as Clermont had been ceded to him in 475 in exchange for Provence being returned to the empire. So a date of 478, three years later is perfectly acceptable. Clovis became king in 48 8 , by 49 1 he was ready to challenge for power . Gre g o ry is quite clear that at this time Clovis did not posess a kingdom but states that Ragnachar his relative did bas ed in Cambrai . This was the cause of the war then a s king, Clovis needed a kingdom.
In 491, now with a young son by a concubine, eighteen year old Clovis was in a strong enough position to challenge Syagrius having enrolled his kinsmen Chararic and Ragnachar (from Cambrai) to help in the battle as they approached Soissons. Clovis may have chosen his moment carefully. The young Alaric had mustered a Visigothic army in 490 and sent it in August to support Theoderic in Italy who had been besieged by the forces of Odoacer at Pavia. This may have led to a depletion of Visigothic units in the north supporting Siagrius. Or Clovis seeing the attention of Alaric on affairs in Italy realised this was a good time to strike. Placing the battle then early in 491 might make sense of the circumstances. Chararic refused to join the battle but this did not stop Clovis and Ragnachar obtaining victory. It's difficult to say if Gregory was just inventing this detail about Chararic not taking part to justify his later tale of Clovis killing him in revenge, but I would lean on the side of invention. Clovis would have needed every man at his side in this war as Syagrius happily met for battle with his Visigothic allies, meaning their armies must have been fairly evenly matched. Ragnachar though would most likley have commanded the field rather than the young Clovis .

The battle may have been a similar one to the battle of Vouille which Gregory describes as a bit of a stand off at the beginning saying one side wanted to fight at a distance, which must have been the Visigoths and one side wanting to get stuck in. The Franks with their power, strength and lethal axes would want to get at the Romano-Visigothic line fairly quickly before enemy archers reduced their numbers. The battle at Vouille also included Gallo Romans who came from Clermont to support Alaric so it was indeed very similar. Both armies therefore would have formed up their battle squares and lines ready for combat. At some point, after the skirmishing, Ragnachar or Clovis gave the command to engage and the lines moved forward, the lethal Frankish charge breaking the Romano-Visigothic line.Once the line was broken the cavalry units would engage and outflank the enemy and take on the Roman-Visigothic cavalry and archers. With the infantry pouring through the middle the leadership of the Romans would be caught up in the mele and be in danger from both cavalry and infantry. Syagrius seeing the battle lost fled the field making his way south to the court of Alaric in Toulouse for protection. Historians have often wondered why he went to Alaric, but now it makes perfect sense when the archaeology explains that the Visigoths had supported his kingdom, as discussed in part two.

Syagrius flees the battle

Gregory states that Clovis was still a pagan at this point in time and that the Franks had despoiled many churches after their victory. Clovis though still appears to have been sympathetic to the Church as he tried to appropriate a captured vase to return it to the Bishop and was mortified when one of his men destroyed it. There is a hint here therefore, that Clovis was already respectful of the Church and their Bishops. Clovis had not inherited a kingdom from his father, the vita Genovefa asserting he was Rex Bellorum, “ King by right of war”. But he now had a kingdom extending to the Sein e.

Gundobad, the Burgundian king and Patrician of the Roman empire had returned from Italy sometime in around 474 after killing the Roman emperor Anthemius and setting up a puppet emperor Glycerius in his place. The eastern empire however was not happy with this turn of events and sent Nepos to intervene, and he deposed Glycerius and became Emperor of the west himself in 474. Wood suggests it may have been this event that caused Gundobad to head back to Burgundy but whilst he was away his father Gundioc had died and Gundobads brothers, Chilperic, Gundomar and Godigisel, in the usual Germanic way, had been apportioned parts of the Burgundian kingdom so he may have returned for this reason also. The circumstances of the deaths of his brothers are unknown. We cannot believe the story Gregory of Tours tells us, that Chilperic and his wife were murdered by Gundobad, being thrown down a well, especially as Chilperic's wife Caretina did not die until around 506 4 . Also a letter from Avitus to Gundobad implies that Gundobad had mourned the deaths of his brothers 5 . It is most likely therefore that two of Gundobad's brothers died in the following war.

The Burgundians in 490 invaded northern Italy wreaking havoc in Liguria and taking thousands of captives back to Burgundy. Theoderic and Odoacer were at the time tied up fighting each other further south. But once Theoderic had killed Odoacer and taken control of Italy in 493 he sent envoys to Gundobad to negotiate the release and return of these captives. At this point Godigisel was described as the kings brother rather than as a king himself. 6 The only brother we hear of at this time onwards is Godigisel. Therefore Gundomar and Chilperic probably died during the invasion of Liguria. On his death in 490 Chilperics daughters Clotilda and Sediluba sought the protection of Godigisel in Geneva according to Fredegar, writing in the seventh century. The reason for going there was probably because Godigisel was Catholic and Gundobad in Vienne, Arian.

Clotilda

Clovis, having defeated Syagrius and obtaining his kingdom in around 49 2 , was now a powerful young King. Gundobad must have observed this rising power and realised that whoever took power in Italy would take him to task for invading and devastating Liguria. He had to make alliances and so offered the hand of his niece Clotilda in marriage to Clovis. We learn, again from Avitus, that Gundobad had meant to offer his own daughter in marriage to Clovis, but that she had died 7 . Having obtained a kingdom Clovis courted Clotilda in Soissons and then married her 8 . Clotilda encouraged him to be baptised a Catholic but after the quick death of their first baptised son he was in no mood to convert at that time 9 . The fact that he allowed his son to be baptised might offer a tentative suggestion that Clovis had converted to Christianity when he had married but had not chosen which form, Arian or Catholic. We will revisit this subject later. Clotilda is said to have been b orn in around 470, if so she was older than Clovis and this may be the reason that she was seen as a re ligous mentor of sorts to the young King.

Clovis was now ready to take on Visigothic possessions to make them hand over Syagrius. That will be in part four.

3. Ibid Carey 2011. At the battle of Casilinum/Volturnus in 554 the Frankish charge took out two rows of a three row Byzantine line made up of both light and heavy infantry. The Franks lost this battle however when heavy Greek cataphract cavalry entered the fray, not to immediately charge the frankish squares which would still have been very dangerous, but to circle and inflict a hail of arrows on them, forcing them back until their squares broke and they were then slaughtered by the cataphracts.

4. Ibid below Shanzer and wood, 2002, p.18

8. MacGeorge, Penny. Late Roman Warlords, Oxford University Press 2003, p.125. From the Liber Historia Francorum.


Mons Badonicus 490 to 517

The last clash involving an army that could be considered even vaguely Roman would likely have been at Mons Badonicus – also known as the Battle of Badon Hill. Much of the specifics of the battle, such as the exact location of the encounter, the size of the opposing forces and even the year it took place remain shrouded in mystery. But historians tend to agree that it took place in Great Britain sometime in the last decade of the 5 th Century or the early years of the 6 th Century. The battle was fought between the Saxon invaders and the Romano-British, loyal Romans who remained in Britannia after Constantine III withdrew the civil and military authority from the region earlier in the 5 th Century. An account of the battle was penned by the British chronicler Gildas sometime between 500 and 570. It tells of how an aristocratic Roman general named Ambrosius Aurelianus formed an army of locals and Roman cast offs to defeat encroaching Saxons. The victory was decisive enough to halt Saxon incursions into Britain for some decades. A 9 th Century text refers to the Roman leader Aurelianus by another name: King Arthur.


World map 486 AD

Primary Sources for East-Hem_486ad.jpg:

  1. The DK Atlas of World History, 2000 edition. (See specific references below)
  2. User:Javierfv1212. Map of the “The_world_in_500_CE.PNG”. Available on Wikipedia.

* African Tribal locations are derived from:

(Bantus, Berbers, Chadians, Cushites, Garamantes, Gur, Khoisans, Mandes, Nilotics, West Atlantic Peoples, etc.)

* Greater India (Including modern Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan):

* Korean & Manchurian information:

III – European information:

* British Isles information is from:

* European borders are primarily derived from:

IV – Australia, Siberia, & Other Fringe Areas

Note: Fringe information is derived from comparisons of these sources:

  1. The DK Atlas of World History, 2000 edition. Map of “The World in 500 CE”. Pgs 50-51.
  2. User:Javierfv1212. Map of the “The_world_in_500_CE.PNG”. Available on Wikipedia.

Note: Much of the information in this map was cross-checked with Bruce Gordon’s Regnal Chronologies.

Europe
Battle of Soissons: Frankish forces under King Clovis I defeat the Gallo-Roman kingdom of Soissons (Gaul). Roman rule under Syagrius ends. The land between the Somme and the Loire becomes a part of the Frankish Empire. Syagrius flees to the Visigoths (under king Alaric II), but Clovis threatens war and he is handed over for execution.
Clovis I establishes his new residence at Soissons. He appoints Ragnachar, Frankish petty king (regulus), as his deputy ruler.


Watch the video: Soissons and the End of the Western Roman Empire