CVE-106 U.S.S. Block Island - History

CVE-106 U.S.S. Block Island - History


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Block Island II

(CVE~106: dp. 11,373; 1. 577'1"; b. 105'2"; dr. 82'; B.
19.1 k.; cpl. 10~; a. 2 5"; cl. Commencement Bag)

The second Block Island (CVE-106) was launched 10 June 1944 as Sunset Bay by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Wash., sponsored by Mrs. L. J. Hallenbeek ; and commissioned as Block Island 30 December 1944, Captain F. M. Hughes in command.

Block Island got underway for Pearl Harbor 20 March 1945. Upon arrival she underwent a period of provisioning and training in preparation for the invasion oi Okinawa. On 17 April Block Island left Hawaii and steamed toward Okinawa, via Ullthi. Flight operations comruenced Immediately upon her arrival 3 May and lasted until 10 June when ~she departed for Leyte After a brief stay at San Pedro Bay, the earrier steamed through the Straits of Makassar for Borneo. Retween 26 June and 6 July she took part in the Balikpapan operation. She then proceeded to Guam where she was anchored at the time of the cessation of hostilities. During-9 September she took part in the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Formosa. She continued cruising in the Far East until 14 October and arrtred at San Diego 11 December 1945. Leaving San Diego 5 January 1946, she transited the Panama Canal and reached Noriolk on the 20th. She was placed in service in reserve 28 May 1946.

On 29 May 1046 Block Island was towed from Norfolk to Annapolis and reported to the Superintendent nf the Naval Academy for duty as training ship for the midshipmen. This duty terminated 3 October 1950 and Block Island was transferred to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

The vessel was recommissioned 28 April 1951 and reported to the Atlantic Fleet. Between June 1951 and November 1953 she carried out local operations ofl the Virginia Capes, made four cruises to the Caribbean; and one to the United Kingdom, France, and Italy (17 April 25 June 1953).

On 15 January 1954 she was placed in commission in reserve at Philadelphia and out of commission in reserve 27 August 1954. Block Island is presently undergoing conversion to an amphibious assault ship.

Block Island received two battle stars for her World War II service.


Block Island

Block Island is an American island in the state of Rhode Island located in Block Island Sound approximately 9 miles (14 km) south of the mainland and 14 miles (23 km) east of Montauk Point, Long Island, New York, named after Dutch explorer Adriaen Block. It is part of Washington County and shares the same area as the town of New Shoreham. The Nature Conservancy added Block Island to its list of "The Last Great Places" which consists of 12 sites in the western hemisphere, and about 40 percent of the island is set aside for conservation. [1] It is part of the Outer Lands region, a coastal archipelago.

Block Island is a popular summer tourist destination and is known for its bicycling, hiking, sailing, fishing, and beaches. It is also the location of Block Island North Light on the northern tip of the island and Block Island Southeast Light on the southeastern side, both historic lighthouses. Much of the northwestern tip of the island is an undeveloped natural area and resting stop for birds along the Atlantic flyway. [2]

Popular events include the annual Fourth of July Parade, celebration, and fireworks. The island's population can triple over the normal summer vacation crowd. As of the 2010 Census, the island's population is 1,051 living on a land area of 9.734 square miles (25.211 km 2 ). [3]


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The second Block Island (CVE-106) was launched 10 June 1944 as Sunset Bay by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc. Tacoma, Wash. sponsored by Mrs. L.J. Hallenbeck, and commissioned as Block Island 30 December 1944, Captain F.M. Hughes in command.

Block Island got underway for Pearl Harbor 20 March 1945. Upon arrival she underwent a period of provisioning and training in preparation for the invasion of Okinawa. On 17 April Block Island left Hawaii and steamed toward Okinawa, via Ulithi. Flight operations commenced immediately upon her arrival 3 May and lasted until 16 June when she departed for Leyte. After a brief stay at San Pedro Bay, the carrier steamed through the Straits of Makassar for Borneo. Between 26 June and 6 July she took part in the Balikpapan operation. She then proceeded to Guam where she was anchored at the time of the cessation of hostilities. During 6-9 September she took part in the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Formosa. She continued cruising in the Far East until 14 October and arrived at San Diego 11 December 1946. Leaving San Diego 6 January 1946, she transited the Panama Canal and reached Norfolk on the 20th. She was placed in service in reserve 28 May 1946.

On 29 May 1946 Block Island was towed from Norfolk to Annapolis and reported to the Superintendent of the Naval Academy for duty as training ship for the midshipmen. This duty terminated 3 October 1950 and Block Island was transferred to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

The vessel was recommissioned 28 April 1951 and reported to the Atlantic Fleet. Between June 1951 and November 1963 she carried out local operations off the Virginia Capes made four cruises to the Caribbean and one to the United Kingdom, France, and Italy (17 April-26 June 1963).

On 15 January 1954 she was placed in commission in reserve at Philadelphia and out of commission in reserve 27 August 1954. Block Island was stricken from the Navy List on 1 July 1959 [and sold 23 February 1960].

Block Island received two battle stars for her World War II service. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey


Contents

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Block Island got underway for Pearl Harbor on 20 March 1945. Upon arrival she underwent a period of provisioning and training in preparation for the invasion of Okinawa. On 17 April, Block Island left Hawaii and steamed toward Okinawa, via Ulithi. Flight operations commenced immediately upon her arrival 3 May and lasted until 16 June when she departed for Leyte. After a brief stay at San Pedro Bay, the carrier steamed through the Straits of Makassar for Borneo. From 26 June-6 July, she took part in the Balikpapan operation. She then proceeded to Guam where she was anchored at the time of the cessation of hostilities.

Post-War [ edit | edit source ]

From 6–9 September, Block Island took part in the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Formosa. She continued cruising in the Far East until 14 October, and arrived at San Diego on 11 December 1945. Leaving San Diego on 6 January 1946, she transited the Panama Canal and reached Norfolk on the 20th. She was placed in service in reserve on 28 May 1946.

On 29 May 1946, Block Island was towed from Norfolk to Annapolis, reporting to the Superintendent of the Naval Academy to serve as a training ship for midshipmen. This duty was terminated on 3 October 1950, and Block Island was transferred to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

The vessel was recommissioned on 28 April 1951 and reported to the Atlantic Fleet. From June 1951-November 1953, she carried out local operations off the Virginia Capes, made four cruises to the Caribbean and one to the United Kingdom, France, and Italy from 17 April–26 June 1953.

On 15 January 1954, she was placed in commission in reserve at Philadelphia and out of commission in reserve on 27 August 1954. In 1957-1958, she was redesignated LPH-1 in anticipation of conversion to an amphibious assault ship, but the conversion was canceled and her designation reverted to CVE-106 before any work was done. Block Island was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 July 1959.


BLOCK ISLAND CVE 106

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Commencement Bay Class Escort Carrier
    Keel Laid October 25 1943
    Launched June 10 1944 as SUNSET BAY (also listed as) SUNSET
    Renamed July 5 1944

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


U.S.S. BLOCK ISLAND

USS Block Island is named for a sound that lies between Long Island, New York and Rhode Island. She was an escort aircraft carrier commissioned on Dec. 30, 1944. After an initial run, the Block Island was sent to San Diego. She was the first carrier of a fully Marine Corps carrier group. She picked up 226 men and began conducting air exercises off of San Diego.

During this time, several aircraft were lost when foul weather arrived and flights were diverted to land. After the tragedy, the ship returned to San Diego and continued preparations. In late March, the ship began cruising towards the Hawaiian Islands. In April, the ship was sent to the Marshalls to muster for Okinawa.

May 10, Block Island entered combat with a mission against the town of Naha. The Marines made continued air strikes on roads, airfields and other targets in and around Okinawa for the next few weeks. After Okinawa was secured, Borneo was the next target. The ship’s aircraft were instrumental in securing Balikpapan. With the Japanese surrender in August 1945, the ship began a life as a training vessel. On Jan. 5, 1952, she returned to active duty as a training ship in Atlantic operations.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Block Island CVE 106

1953 Caribbean and Europe Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history. (Most Sailors consider the cruise book one of their most valued treasures)

You would be purchasing the USS Block Island cruise book during the Korean War era. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Some Ports of Call: Ciudad, Viva La Fort de France, Kingston Jamaica, GTMO, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Ireland, Plymouth, London, France, Naples, Pompeii, Sorrento and Rome
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Crew roster by State Showing Name, Rank and hometown
  • Plus much more

Over 238 photos and the ships story told on 136 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Escort Aircraft Carrier during the Korean War era.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the Block Island (National Archives)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in Navy ship documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

    Be sure to add us to your !

    Thanks for your Interest!


    Powered by
    The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.

    This CD is for your personal use only

    Copyright © 2003-2010 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


    USS Parrott (DD-218)

    USS Parrott (DD-218) was a Clemson class destroyer that served in the Mediterranean and Black Sea in 1922-25 and with the Asiatic Fleet from 1925 onwards. She survived the disastrous attempt to defend the Malay Barrier early in 1942, and returned to the US, from where she carried out escort duties and took part in anti-submarine hunter killer operations, before being decommissioned after she was badly damaged in a collision in 1944.

    The Parrott was named after George Fountain Parrott, a US naval officer who was killed when the destroyer Shaw (DD-68) collided with the troopship HMS Aquitania on 9 October 1918.

    The Parrott was laid down at Cramp&rsquos of Philadelphia on 23 July 1919, launched on 25 November 1919 and commissioned on 11 May 1920.

    The Parrott&rsquos first tour of duty saw her join Destroyer Division 38 of the Pacific Fleet, based at San Diego. She arrived at her new base on 7 September 1920, where she became the flagship of her division. She operated along the west coast of American, from US waters to Valparaiso, Chile.

    On 3 December 1921 the Parrott was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, and moved to Philadelphia. On 26-30 May 1922 she was used to escort the Presidential yacht Mayflower from Hampton Road to Washington. She was then chosen for service in the Mediterranean and Black Sea.

    The Parrott and her division (Bulmer, Litchfield (DD-336), Parrott, Edsall (DD-219), MacLeish (DD-220), Simpson (DD-221) and McCormick (DD-223)) departed for Turkish waters on 12 June 1922. This flotilla departed from Philadelphia on 5 June and Newport on 12 June and reached Gibraltar on 22 June 1922. She reported to the Commander, US Naval Detachment in Turkish Waters at Constantinople. She was used to support relief efforts around the Black Sea coast of Russia and coast of the collapsed Ottoman Empire, as a communications ship, carrying mail between US bases, and as a station ship. From 13 September to 25 October 1922 she was used to evacuate refugees from Smyrna after the great fire that broke out soon after Turkish troops regained control of the port.

    The Parrott was also used to show the flag. From 6 July-24 August 1923 she visited Greece, Turkey, Romania, Bulgaria and Russia.

    On 6 May 1924 the Parrott was transferred to the command of the Commander, Naval Forces, Europe, as the presence in the Near East was scaled down. During 1924 she made formal visits to Bizerte, Tunis, Legarno, Genoa, Patmos, Villefranche, Cagliari and Sardinia. After this diplomatic tour she returned to the United States, reaching New York in July 1924.

    The Parrott&rsquos next assignment was to the Asiatic Fleet, where she would remain well into the Second World War. She left Philadelphia on 3 January 1925, and joined the Asiatic Fleet at Chefoo (now known as Yantai) in China on14 June 1925. She arrived during a period of high tension around Shanghai, and the Parrott joined a US flotilla that moved there, putting a landing force ashore. The Parrott remained at Shanghai until 31 July, and then returned again between 10 September and 16 October 1925 to serve with the Yangtze River Patrol.

    Anyone who served on the landing force in June-July 1925 qualified for the Shanghai Expeditionary Medal.

    The general pattern of operations for the Asiatic Fleet at this time was to spend the winter in Philippine waters and the summer in Chinese waters. The Parrott spend the period from 19 October 1925 to 15 March 1926 operating from Manila, and then joined the South China Patrol at its base at Swatow (Shantou), where she remained until 14 June. She spent the rest of the summer operating along the Chinese coast, before being relieved on 25 October 1927. Once again she returned to Manila, this time via Hong Kong, Bangkok and Saigon.

    On 26 August 1928 the minesweeper USS Avocet (Minesweeper No.19) ran aground on a sand bar during a typhoon. It took a great deal of effort to lift her back off the sand bar. This included using the Parrott, MacLeish (DD-220) and Simpson (DD-221) to steam past her at high speed to create a wave to rock her free. Eventually this played a part in her successful rescue.

    In 1928 the Parrott was used to show the flag at a number of Philippine ports that rarely saw American warships. This also included a trip to Guam, where she was photographed on 3 November 1928.

    Anyone who served on her during one of fifteen periods between 7 January 1927 and 25 October 1932 qualified for the Yangtze Service Medal.

    In February 1932 the Parrott was part of a US fleet that moved to Shanghai during the first Japanese attack on the city.

    In 1935 she was ordered to French Indo-China to collect hydrographic data in and around Saigon (as part of a squadron that included the destroyers Peary, Pillsbury and Pope and the support ship Black Hawk). The squadron reached Tourane on 16 October and Saigon on 22 October, and departed for Manila on 2 November.

    Between 1936 and 1940 she served as the station ship at Amoy and at Swatow.

    In 1937 she returned to Shanghai to protect US interests as the Japanese attacked the city once again. In August 1937 she was docked at Gough Island, near Shanghai, when a Nakajima E8N1 &lsquoDave&rsquo floatplane was shot down, ended up in the water right along side her. Japanese salvage operations thus had to take place with an interested American audience.

    In June 1938 she took part in a goodwill visit to French Indochina (with the Pope and Stewart), visiting Tourane from 20-25 June and Haiphong from 26-28 June, before returning to Manila on 30 June.

    Anyone who served on her during four periods between 7 July 1937 and 4 September 1939 qualified for the China Service Medal

    The Parrott spent the first two months of 1941 at the Cavite Navy Yard, having anti-mine and sound detection gear installed. On 6 October she was assigned as the off shore sound patrol picket at the entrance to Manila Bay. However Admiral Hart, the commander of the Asiatic Fleet, didn&rsquot want his destroyers to be trapped in Philippine Waters if the Japanese attacked, and in late November the Parrott joined Task Force 5 (Marblehead (CL-12), Stewart (DD-224), Barker (DD-213), Parrott (DD-218) and Paul Jones (DD-230)), which was making a visit to Tarakan, Borneo, in the Dutch East Indies.

    The task force was still at Tarakan when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and invaded the Philippines. It moved south to Surabaya, Java, where it operated with British, Dutch and Australian forces as part of the new ABDA command.

    On 27 December 1941 the Parrott left Surabaya as part of Task Force 5 (Holland(AD-3), Whippoorwill (AM-35), Langley, Marblehead, William B. Preston (AVD-7) and Stewart, heading for Darwin, Australia, arriving on 5 January 1942.

    In mid January the Parrott was part of a US force that attempted to catch a Japanese force at Celebes, but by the time the Americans arrived, the Japanese had gone. The task force returned to Kupang Bay on Dutch Timor on 18 January.

    The Parrott then took part in one of the few Allied successes of this campaign, when she took part in a destroyer attack on a Japanese naval force in Balikpapan Bay. Between them the Parrott, John D. Ford (DD-228), Pope (DD-225) and Paul Jones (DD-230) sank four transports and one patrol boat (a First World War era destroyer) early on 24 January 1942 and then escaped intact.

    The Parrott returned to Surabaya on 25 January. On 30 January she sailed to help escort two Dutch ships (Tjileboet and Tjitjalengka) to the Lombok Strait. On 2 February the destroyers were ordered to join a US convoy heading to Java from Darwin, reaching Tjilatjap on 4 February.

    In mid-February the Parrott took part in an attempt to intercept a Japanese force heading for the east coast of Sumatra. On 15 February the ABDA force was attacked three times by Japanese aircraft, but the Parrott was undamaged during this attack.

    After refuelling at Surabaya the Parrott was part of a sizable ABDA force that attempted to attack Japanese forces off Bali (battle of Badung Strait, 19-20 February 1942). Despite outnumbering the Japanese, the Allies were far worse at night fighting, and they lost one destroyer (the Dutch Piet Hein), while the Japanese escaped. The Parrott ran aground in the shallows off Bali but managed to get herself free and returned to Surabaya with the rest of the fleet.

    By now the Parrott was running short of torpedoes and other supplies. She was chosen to escort SS Seawitch to Tjilatjap, arriving on 28 February. She was then sent to Fremantle, and thus missed the disastrous battle of the Java Sea.

    The Parrott escorted the tender Black Hawk to Pearl Harbor, arriving on 15 June.

    The Parrott continued on to the West Coast, where she underwent repairs that were over by July. She then served as an escort on eight trips from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor, often operating with the Bulmer, another survivor of the Asiatic Fleet.

    On 21 February she left San Francisco along with the Henderson (AP-1), Bulmer (DD-222) and William Ward Burrows, reaching Pearl Harbor on 2 March despite running into heavy weather.

    On 30 March 1943 the Parrott, along with the Barker and Paul Jones left San Francisco heading for New York. They passed through the Panama Canal on 6 May and moved to New York, where they reported for duty on the transatlantic convoys.

    The Parrott moved to New York in June, and carried out one return trip on escort duty. She then joined the hunter-killer anti-submarine group based around USS Croatan (CVE-25), along with the Paul Jones and the Belknap (AVD-8). She served with the Croatan&rsquos group until 15 October, when she joined the hunter-killer group based on the Block Island (CVE-106) (Paul Jones (DD-230), Parrott, Barker (DD-213) and Bulmer (DD-222)).

    On 25 October the Parrott was sent to investigate a radar contact, which turned out to be the surfaced U-488. The Parrott opened fire and managed to hole the submarine&rsquos conning tower, but she managed to escape. On 28 October aircraft from the Block Island sank U-220. The cruise ended when the group reached Casablanca on 5 November,

    On 10 November the group left Casablanca as part of the escort for Convoy GUS-220. She was then detached to try and find submarines off the Azores, before reaching Norfolk on 25 November 1943.

    The Parrott remained with the group when it departed from the US on 15 December, as part of the escort for Convoy UGS-27. On 19 December the hunter-killer group was detached to hunt for U-boats north of the Azores. On 29 December the Parrott&rsquos sonar detected a group of nine U-boats, but the weather was too bad for the Block Island&rsquos aircraft to operate, and the destroyers were unable to sink any of the U-boats. The group reached Casablanca on 4 January 1944.

    The group left Casablanca on 8 January 1944 as part of the escort for two British convoys.

    On 11 January 1944, while moved west across the Atlantic, she took part in a depth charge attack on a possible U-boat, again serving alongside the Bulmer. Later on the same day (or possibly on 14 January) the two destroyers rescued the captain, three other officers and thirteen enlisted men from a U-boat that had been sunk by land-based aircraft, probably U-231, sunk in the same area north-east of the Azores. The group then stopped at the Azores, where the Bulmer and Parrott were able to take on more depth charges. However bad weather limited the group&rsquos effectiveness after this and they returned to Norfolk on 3 February. This ended the Parrott&rsquos connection with the Block Island, which sailed with a different escort group on her next mission.

    In March 1944 the Parrott returned to convoy escort duties. She escorted Convoy UGS-35 to Casablanca, arriving on 26 March. She was then used to bombard the coast of Spanish Morocco, close to Cape Spartel, on 27 March 1944, part of an effort to put pressure on Franco. She then helped escort Convoy GUS-34 back to Boston, arriving on 15 April 1944.

    The Parrott&rsquos war came to an accidental end on 2 May 1944. She was rammed by the SS John Morton while getting underway at Norfolk. The lightly constructed destroyer suffered such heavy damage that she had to be towed ashore by tugs. She was towed to Norfolk Naval Yard, but was considered to be too badly damaged to be worth repairing. She was decommissioned on 14 June 1944, struck from the Navy List on 18 July 1944 and sold for scrap on 5 April 1947.

    Parrott earned two battle stars for service in World War II, for Asiatic Fleet operations (8 December 1941-7 March 1942) and for engagements in the Dutch East Indies at the Makassar Strait on 23-24 January 1942 and Badoeng Strait on 19-20 February 1942)


    Our Newsletter

    Product Description

    USS Block Island CVE 21 and CVE 106

    World War II Cruise Book (RARE FIND)

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of Naval history.

    You would be purchasing the USS Block Island cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Story of two Escort Carriers with the same name
    • Cruise chart
    • Detailed description of ship activity
    • Air operations
    • Campaign at Okinawa
    • Wild men of Borneo
    • Crossing the Equator
    • VJ day
    • Ships Log - Date and location
    • Typical "Plan of the Day"
    • Divisional crew photos
    • Crew roster (Name and rank)
    • Plus much more

    Over 177 pictures and the ships story told on 64 pages.

    Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on these Escort Carriers during World War II.

    Additional Bonus:

    • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
    • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
    • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
    • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
    • Other Interesting Items Include:
      • The Oath of Enlistment
      • The Sailors Creed
      • Core Values of the United States Navy
      • Military Code of Conduct
      • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
      • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
      • Hunky-Dory and many more.

      Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

      • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
      • Self contained CD no software to load.
      • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
      • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
      • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
      • Viewing options are described in the help section.
      • Bookmark your favorite pages.
      • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
      • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
      • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

      Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

      The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

      If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

      We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

      If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

      Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

      Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

      Be sure to add us to your !

      Thanks for your Interest!


      Powered by
      The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.

      This CD is for your personal use only

      Copyright © 2003-2010 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


      DER-326

      On 24 July 1956, she was delivered to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for conversion to radar picket escort ship and, on 1 November 1956, she was redesignated DER-326.

      She was recommissioned on 2 August 1957 and spent the remainder of the year in training exercises out of Newport, R.I., and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. On 30 December, she departed Newport and began duties on the Atlantic Barrier, a part of the North American Defense Command. Operating out of Newport, she completed 12 radar picket assignments in the next year and one-half, breaking the routine duty with a visit to Belgium and the United Kingdom in August 1958.

      In July 1959, Thomas J. Gary entered the Boston Navy Yard for overhaul. She remained there until 30 October when she got underway for refresher training in waters off the coast of Cuba. On 20 December, she resumed her former duties in the Atlantic alternating North Atlantic Barrier and Contiguous Radar Coverage System assignments.

      Early in 1961, she varied radar picket duties with participation in Operation "Springboard" and, in May, she steamed off Bermuda participating in Operation "Lantbex." In August, she completed a DEW Line assignment in the northeast Atlantic with a visit to Scotland and finished out the year in overhaul at Boston.

      Thomas J. Gary next set her course of Guantanamo for refresher training then, on 10 July 1962, she steamed from Newport for now familiar North Atlantic picket deployment. Between picket assignments, she put in at Greenock and at Wilhelmshaven for well-earned recreation for all hands. Shortly after her return to Newport on 22 October, she was called upon to conduct patrols in support of the Cuban Quarantine. Relieved of her patrol station off Key West on 29 November, she returned to Newport for availability and a welcome holiday in homeport.

      She filled the opening months of 1963 with radar picket duty out of Key West as Southern Tip Picket, and two tours as Sonar School Ship at Key West. In April, a period of tender availability was cut short for Thomas J. Gary when she was called upon to take part in the unproductive search for the submarine Thresher (SSN-593) lost off the Atlantic coast. She resumed Southern Tip Picket duties in July, and she returned to Newport late in August. On 24 September, she arrived at Boston for the overhaul and trials, which occupied the remainder of the year.

      She opened 1964 with operations in the Caribbean including refresher training and participation in Operation "Springboard." She spent March undergoing availability at Newport and, during April and May, patrolled on picket station off Florida, with time out in May for a good will visit to Fall River, Mass., on Armed Forces Day. She continued picket duties for the rest of the year breaking her routine with gunnery exercises off the Virginia Capes and a visit to the Naval Academy in October.

      After participating in the annual exercise Operation "Springboard" again in 1965, she resumed picket duties and, on 30 June, phased out the Southern Tip Picket Station where she had spent so much of her post- World War II career. On 13 September, she departed Newport for a nine-month deployment in the Pacific which took her through the Panama Canal later that month and included support for Operation "Deepfreeze," a scientific expedition to the Antarctic. In March 1966, she departed New Zealand and steamed, via the Suez Canal, to the Mediterranean. Her ports of call in that ancient sea and in the eastern Atlantic included Barcelona, Bremen, Copenhagen, and Edinburgh. She returned to Newport on 21 May 1966.

      Thomas J. Gary again got underway from Newport on 24 August and set her course, via the Panama Canal and Pago Pago to Dunedin, New Zealand, her replenishment port during her participation in Operation "Deepfreeze." Manning her station midway between McMurdo Sound and New Zealand, Thomas J. Gary acted as logistics headquarters for Operation "Deepfreeze" and stood ready to provide search and rescue for downed fliers. She remained in southern waters through the end of 1966.

      In March, she called at Perth, Australia then she set her course on the 23rd for the Suez Canal. She called at European ports and returned to Newport on 24 May. On 1 July, her home port was officially changed to Key West. After her arrival there on 9 July, she helped to test experimental equipment during Operation "Combat Keel" late in the year. On 12 December, she returned to Key West for a period of upkeep.

      In 1968, she operated out of Key West conducted refresher training out of Guantanamo and, in August, participated in support operation for the practice firing of Polaris missiles by nuclear submarine Daniel Webster (SSBN-626). Later in the year, she conducted special operations in the Bahamas and acted as school ship for the Fleet Sonar School at Key West.

      She continued operations in the Caribbean and off Florida into 1969. In July, she began a special four-month deployment during which she conducted intelligence support activities for antisubmarine forces in the Atlantic and earned a Navy Unit Commendation. She visited the Canary Islands and Malta before returning to Key West late in October.

      After participating in Operation "Springboard" off Puerto Rico early in 1970, she got underway on 1 April and steamed across the Atlantic for operations which took her to Spain, Denmark, Germany, and the British Isles. On this deployment, she helped to develop new techniques and tactics in antisubmarine warfare in such an exemplary manner that she was awarded another Navy Unit Commendation. She returned to Key West on 7 September and operated out of that port into 1972 providing surveillance in support of the Atlantic Fleet. Departing Key West on 14 January 1972, she visited Wilhemshaven then returned via Senegal to the United States. Back in Key West in March, she resumed local operations out of that port which she continued well into 1973.

      In September 1973, she began preparations for transfer to the Tunisian government. That month, 33 members of a Tunisian turnover team came on board for training. On 12 October, she got underway from Charleston and crossed the Atlantic, stopping briefly at Ponta Delgada and Palma de Mallorca before arriving at Bizerte on 21 October. The next day, Thomas J. Gary was decommissioned in ceremonies at the Quai d'Honneur, Bizerte and moments later, the ship was commissioned by the Tunisian Navy as the President Bourgiba. Her name was struck from the Navy list that same day.

      She suffered a major fire on April 16, 1992 and is no longer operational.


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